Saturday, January 17, 2015

⚓️⚓️⚓️ ️Naval Historical Command - Changes and Reductions ⚓️⚓️⚓️

It appears that the plug has now been pulled on the old Naval History and Heritage Command website (including the "official" version of the Online Library of Selected Images).  This was expected, as the command has put a lot of time and money into reconfiguring its online presence, but it is clear that a great deal of probably irreplaceable content is now gone, along with nearly all hyperlinks to the old site.

The HyperWar "mirror" site that was established in 2009 (once the program of NHHC's then-new management became clear) contains about 99.8% of the Online Library's ultimate content (see http://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/OnlineLibrary/branches/org11-2.htm ), but access to the rest of NHHC's old site will have to be pursued via an Internet archive site (one of which is the Internet Archive Wayback Machine ... http://archive.org/web/ ).

The "new" NHHC site is functioning, though with only a modest amount of content, some of which appears to be based on things that were originally on the "old" site.  However, I don't know how much those things were changed in the transition.

To explore the new NHHC site, start here and follow the links:  http://www.history.navy.mil

In the long run (perhaps not too many months off), the new site may provide convenient access to many more images than the old one, including high-resolution TIFFs and JPGs.   However, this is, as yet, a potential "boon" for the Naval historical community, with the functionality and quality of content yet to be determined.  Time will tell.

⚓️USS Peleliu to be Decommissioned After Nearly 35 Years of Service ⚓️

The amphibious assault ship USS Peleliu (LHA 5) is underway as part of the Peleliu Amphibious Ready Group and is conducting joint forces exercises in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility.
SAN DIEGO (NNS) -- The amphibious assault ship USS Peleliu (LHA 5) will end nearly 35 years of service during a decommissioning ceremony scheduled for 10 a.m. at Pier #7 at Naval Base San Diego, March 31.

The last general-purpose amphibious assault ship of the Tarawa class, Peleliu's decommissioning marks the end of a career comprising multiple deployments to U.S. 7th and 5th Fleet, humanitarian efforts and peacekeeping missions.

Capable of launching a coordinated air and sea attack from one platform, Peleliu has conducted 17 deployments, 178,051 flight operations, served 57,983 personnel and steamed approximately 1,011,946 nautical miles since being commissioned May 3, 1980 in Pascagoula, Mississippi.

Significant in its history, Peleliu played a critical part in Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom after the events of Sept. 11, 2001. Peleliu was the first ship in the Global War on Terror to deploy Marines to the beach in support of operations in Afghanistan.

Capt. Paul Spedero will be the last in the long line of 23 commanding officers. Cmdr. Donald Hudson, Peleliu's executive officer, will make up the final decommissioning chain of command.

After the decommissioning process is complete, Peleliu will be towed from San Diego to Pearl Harbor to join the reserve fleet.

Named for the Battle of Peleliu in World War II, the ship will be placed in an inactive reserve status and moored alongside the class's namesake USS Tarawa (LHA 1).

Peleliu's motto, "Pax Per Potens," will stand long after its decommissioning as a testament to the ship's legacy of providing "Peace Through Power."

For more information on Peleliu or the decommissioning ceremony, contact pao@lha5.navy.mil or visit https://www.facebook.com/USSPeleli. 

For more news from Naval Surface Forces, visit www.navy.mil/local/cnsp/.

⚓️The story of eight heroes killed on Stranton tug during WW1⚓️




The story of eight heroes killed on Stranton tug during WW1


TUG: The Stranton
TUG: The Stranton

THE story of eight heroes from Hartlepool is being re-lived as part of a new project.
The sinking of a tug called Stranton in 1915 makes up part of the new Heroism & Heartbreak project which was being launched today at the Central Library in York Road.
But there’s still plenty of time for people to play their part in the new venture which encourages people to come forward with memorabilia of the First World War at sea.
Project manager Gary Green would love to see anyone who has photographs, letters or diaries of a relative who served at sea during the First World War.
To help people get involved, Gary has shared some dramatic images of ships which are already part of an archive collection.
They include the damaged ship Firfield which was attacked during the Bombardment of Hartlepool.
They also include dramatic images of a German U-boat crew and some of the images it took while it was in service.
And on top of all that, Gary has also shared one Hartlepool story of bravery and tragedy which happened exactly 100 years ago today.
It centres on the Stranton which was built at South Shields by J.P. Rennoldson in 1899 for the North East Railway and was based at Hartlepool.
At the outbreak of the First World War, the Stranton and five other NER tugs were requisitioned by the Admiralty and taken over for war work.
She was renamed and became HMS Char, entering Royal Navy service on November 17.
Gary said: “The eight-man crew volunteered to stay with their ship and were duly enrolled in the Mercantile Marine Reserve, being given equivalent Royal Navy rankings. A further nine Royal Navy men made up the rest of the crew.
“She was classed as an unarmed boarding vessel and was based at Ramsgate on the east coast as part of the Downs Boarding Flotilla.”
Her task was to check all vessels passing through a stretch of water between the Goodwin Sands and the Kent Coast.
But tragically, her naval service was very short, as Gary explained.
“In the early hours of Saturday, January 16, 1915 while on patrol in the Downs in very stormy weather, she approached a ship in distress, the Belgian steamer Frivan.
“While standing-off to assess the situation, a large sea drove her against Frivan’s bow.
“Holed below the waterline, HMS Char immediately began to sink. In the gale force winds and huge seas the Belgian crew could do little to help, and HMS Char drifted away in the dark.”
In response to distress rockets sent up by the Frivan, the Deal lifeboat was launched, but after searching for several hours in atrocious conditions, was unable to find the tug or any of her 17-man crew, including eight from Hartlepool.
The eight Hartlepool men lost were:
E. Booth, Fireman (formerly Deck Hand)
W. Booth, Artificer (formerly Engineer)
R. Fergus, Petty Officer (formerly Mate)
M. Hastings, Able Seaman (formerly Deck Hand)
W. Hatch, Fireman (same role as in NER service)
J. E. Hunter, Fireman (same role as in NER service)
G. Nossiter, Artificer (formerly Second Engineer)
J. P. Whale, Lieutenant (Captain in command of HMS Char, formerly Master)
The tragic story of HMS Char is one of the Heroism & Heartbreak Project’s “talking history” features, which can be accessed through the Hartlepool History Then & Now website at www.hhtandn.org.
Diane Marlborough, Hartlepool Council’s Reference and Information Manager, said library staff and project volunteers want to “help people discover more about their ancestor’s war record and to explore their own family history using existing local and national records. We are also very interested in the role of Hartlepool’s women during the First World War, particularly those who worked in the Hartlepool shipyards and Munitions Factory”
If you have any further information relating the crew of the Stranton - or you can help the project to build up its collection of images and other items from the First World War - get in touch by e-mailing infodesk@hartlepool.gov.uk phoning (01429) 242909, or call in to Hartlepool Central Library.

Shell shock solved: Scientists pinpoint brain injury that causes pain,anxiety and breakdowns in soldiers

By the end of World War One the army had identified 80,000 cases of a new condition they termed as 'shell shock'. 
Scientists have been perplexed by the symptoms - that include anxiety, facial tics as well as terrible nightmares - ever since but, after more than a century of research, the mystery may have been solved.
Experts now believe that a honeycomb pattern of broken nerve fibres in the brains of veterans that survived improvised explosive devices (IED) attacks, is responsible for the condition officially termed as blast neurotrauma.
By the end of World War One, the army had identified 80,000 soldiers suffering from shell shock and after 100 years, scientists have now discovered a honeycomb pattern of broken nerve fibres in the brains of veterans that seem to show the brain injury caused by war. British soldiers in the trenches are pictured
By the end of World War One, the army had identified 80,000 soldiers suffering from shell shock and after 100 years, scientists have now discovered a honeycomb pattern of broken nerve fibres in the brains of veterans that seem to show the brain injury caused by war. British soldiers in the trenches are pictured
Researchers at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland, conducted autopsies on US combat veterans who survived blasts in Afghanistan and Iraq, but later died of other causes.
They discovered that they had the same kind of brain injury – a distinctive honeycomb pattern of broken and swollen nerve fibres throughout critical brain regions, including those that control decision making, memory and reasoning.
The pattern is different from brain damage caused by car crashes, drug overdoses or collision sports.
Vassilis Koliatsos, a professor of pathology, neurology, and psychiatry and behavioural sciences at the university, explained that survivable blasts may cause hidden brain injuries that play a role in the psychological and social problems some veterans face after coming home.
The scientists explained  that survivable blasts may cause hidden brain injuries that play a role in the psychological and social problems some veterans face after coming home. Here, a soldier breaks down in Iraq after learning his friend was killed, and another (centre) suffers from burns caused by a blast
The scientists explained  that survivable blasts may cause hidden brain injuries that play a role in the psychological and social problems some veterans face after coming home. Here, a soldier breaks down in Iraq after learning his friend was killed, and another (centre) suffers from burns caused by a blast

SHELL SHOCK AND WORLD WAR ONE 

Millions of soldiers suffered psychological trauma as a result of their war experiences.
Symptoms ranged from anxiety and facial tics, to stomach cramps, as well as terrible nightmares and insomnia, as they relived scenes of slaughter.
By the end of World War One, the army had dealt with 80,000 cases of shell shock, which was first recognised in 1917.
War neuroses accounted for one in seven men discharged from the British Army.
At the beginning of the war, scientists believed that the condition was caused by physical injuries to the nerves, but the man who coined the phrase, medical officer Charles Myers, realised that some soldiers suffered from shell shock who had not been in the front lines.
He, and others, began to think that psychological factors were responsible for breakdowns.
If doctors thought shell shock was caused by nerve damage, they treated soldiers with massage, rest, exercise regimes and electric shock treatments, but if they thought it was psychological, hypnosis and rest was prescribed.
‘This is the first time the tools of modern pathology have been used to look at a 100-year-old problem: the lingering effect of blasts on the brain,’ he said.
Molecular probes were used to reveal details in the brains that they examined, according to the study, published in Acta Neuropathologica Communications.
Senior author, Professor Koliatsos, said: ‘We identified a pattern of tiny wounds, or lesions, that we think may be the signature of blast injury.’
‘The location and extent of these lesions may help explain why some veterans who survive IED attacks have problems putting their lives back together.’
Soldiers have struggled with bomb-induced brain damage, which was dubbed shell shock, since 1914, when German and Allied forces bombarded each other for months on end.
The condition is now known as blast neurotrauma and still  affects some soldiers who served in Iraq and Afghanistan, where the use of IEDs were widespread.
Doctors treating IED survivors ‘often see depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress, and substance abuse or adjustment disorders,’ said Professor Koliatsos
‘Life is very difficult for some of these veterans and it’s important to understand that at least a portion of these difficulties may have a neurological foundation.’
In the study, the scientists used a molecular marker to track a protein called APP that normally travels from one nerve cell to another via a long nerve fibre, or axon.
When axons are broken by an injury, APP and other proteins accumulate at the breaks, causing swelling.
The study revealed that bulbs on the nerve fibres of the soldiers were medium-sized, unlike those of people who died in car crashes or drug overdoes. Near the damaged axons, specialised cells, called microglia, that are involved in brain inflammation, were revealed. A stock image of a mammal microglia cell is shown
The study revealed that bulbs on the nerve fibres of the soldiers were medium-sized, unlike those of people who died in car crashes or drug overdoes. Near the damaged axons, specialised cells, called microglia, that are involved in brain inflammation, were revealed. A stock image of a mammal microglia cell is shown
Shell shock is now known as blast neurotrauma and affects some soldiers who served in Iraq and Afghanistan, where the use of IEDs were widespread
War poets Siegfried Sassoon and Wilfred Owen (pictured) both suffered from the condition, which Owen described as 'minds the Dead have ravished'
Shell shock, now known as blast neurotrauma, affects many soldiers who served in Iraq and Afghanistan, where the use of IEDs were widespread. War poets Siegfried Sassoon (left) and Wilfred Owen (right) both suffered from the condition, which Owen described as 'minds the Dead have ravished'
In the brains of people killed in car accidents, the swellings were large and bulb-shaped, while in cases of methadone overdose, these axonal swellings were small.
In the brains of four of the five veterans who survived wartime blast injuries, the axonal bulbs were medium-sized and usually arrayed in a honeycomb pattern near blood vessels.
‘We did not see that pattern in other types of brain injury,’ Professor Koliatsos said.
The veterans’ brains did not show signs of the neurodegenerative disease known as punch-drunk syndrome, which is caused by multiple concussions.
But near the damaged axons, specialised cells, called microglia, that are involved in brain inflammation, were revealed.
Dr Koliatsos explained: ‘In brains that had been exposed to blasts, we see microglial cells right next to these unusual axonal abnormalities.
The presence of these cells suggests the veterans who overdosed had pre-existing brain injuries.
Lesions may be fragments of nerve fibres that broke at the time of the blast and slowly deteriorated, or may have been weakened by the blast and broken by some later accident like a concussion or drug overdose, the study says.
Soldiers have struggled with bomb-induced brain damage, which was dubbed shell shock, since 1914, when German and Allied forces bombarded each other for months on end, here a soldier writes a letter home
Soldiers have struggled with bomb-induced brain damage, which was dubbed shell shock, since 1914, when German and Allied forces bombarded each other for months on end, here a soldier writes a letter home

HOW THE STUDY WAS CONDUCTED 

Researchers examined the brains of five male United States military veterans who survived IED attacks but later died.
The bodies were donated to the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology.
Three of the men died of methadone overdoses, one of a gunshot wound to the head and one of multiple organ failure.
The researchers compared the veterans’ brains to those of 24 people who died of a range of causes, including motor vehicle crashes, opiate overdoses and heart attacks.
They used a molecular marker to track a protein called APP that normally travels from one nerve cell to another via a long nerve fibre, or axon and found that the axonal bulbs of the veterans were medium-sized and usually arrayed in a honeycomb pattern near blood vessels.
Near the damaged axons, specialised cells, called microglia, that are involved in brain inflammation, were revealed.
Dr Koliatsos explained: ‘In brains that had been exposed to blasts, we see microglial cells right next to these unusual axonal abnormalities.
The presence of these cells suggests the veterans who overdosed had pre-existing brain injuries.
Lesions may be fragments of nerve fibres that broke at the time of the blast and slowly deteriorated, or may have been weakened by the blast and broken by some later accident like a concussion or drug overdose, the study says.

Jankowski's 'Verdun' wins World War One Historical Association's book

Jankowski's 'Verdun' wins World War One Historical Association's book 

Shell shock solved: Scientists pinpoint brain injury that causes pain, anxiety and breakdowns in soldiers


The World War One Historical Association has awarded Paul Jankowski, the Raymond Ginger Professor of History, the 2014 Norman B. Tomlinson, Jr. Book Prize for his book “Verdun: The Longest Battle of the Great War.”
The prize is offered annually for the best historical work on World War One. It consists of a check for $3,000 and a bronze plaque.
The Battle of Verdun is noted for its length - it lasted for 10 months – and its brutality, and is the subject of many books that have largely analyzed the military tactics. Jankowski has been lauded for taking a different approach in his writing. His book provides insight on the human experience and includes both the German and French perspective.


Friday, January 16, 2015

⚓️Chinese fleet brings out the crowds in visit to Britain ⚓️


Text:|Print|

Chinese fleet brings out the crowds in visit to Britain

2015-01-16 09:12chinadaily.com.cnWeb Editor: Si Huan
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Ambassador Liu Xiaoming (center) joins naval officers, Rear Admiral Zhang Chuanshu (left) and Vice Admiral Philip Jones at the deck reception. [Photo by Wang Mingjie/chinadaily.com.cn]
Ambassador Liu Xiaoming (center) joins naval officers, Rear Admiral Zhang Chuanshu (left) and Vice Admiral Philip Jones at the deck reception. [Photo by Wang Mingjie/chinadaily.com.cn] 
The largest Chinese Navy fleet to visit Britain was given a rapturous welcome from locals, including hundreds of Chinese origin, as it began a five-day official visit at Royal Naval Base in Portsmouth on Jan 12.
The 18th escort task force of the Chinese Navy fleet comprises three ships: the amphibious dock landing ship Chang Bai Shan, the guided missile frigate Yuncheng and the supply ship Chaohu. In addition, there are three helicopters, and the crews consist of nearly 100 special operations members and more than 800 officers and sailors.
The three ships have just fulfilled a four-month-long counterpiracy escort mission in the Gulf of Aden and off the coast of Somalia.
Britain is the first stop on a five-country tour, to be followed by Germany, the Netherlands, France and Greece. The visit to Britain is the first by Chinese Navy ships in seven years and the third one in history.
Describing the fleet as the largest to visit Britain, Liu Xiaoming, Chinese Ambassador to the country, said the visit "gives a flavor of the partnership between China and the UK. It is also good for the British public to understand the Chinese military and what it is able to do."
During the five-day visit, senior officers from both navies were expected to discuss a series of maritime topics including recent counterpiracy operations in the Indian Ocean.
"It has been seven years since our last visit," Liu said. "The world has changed and so has the reach of the Chinese Navy. So we have a lot to talk about. There is a lot for the two navies to share. And this visit will go a long way to strengthening our relationship."
Rear Admiral Zhang Chuanshu, commander of the task force said: "Our visit to the UK is a good opportunity to enhance our understanding of each other. It's a great opportunity for our sailors to get exposure to local people and our counterparts in the Royal Navy."
Commodore Jeremy Rigby, Naval Base Commander, extended a warm welcome to his Chinese visitors to the operational home of the Royal Navy, and acknowledged the significance of such military exchanges.
"As with our ship visits abroad, these events are not only of great diplomatic significance, but also very useful militarily given that we share similar global challenges including counterpiracy, preventing conflict, protecting our citizens overseas and supporting UN peacekeeping efforts.
"China, like us, relies on trade at sea for its prosperity, and we work together around the world. The visit to Portsmouth is a really good way for us to talk, navy to navy, with like-minded sailors, sharing information on our operations."
The Chang Bai Shan and the Yuncheng were to be open to the public for three days from Jan 13, and Liu said he hoped the British public, especially younger people, would have the opportunity to visit the ships.
The Chinese Navy has carried out 48 missions in the Gulf region since December 2008.
"Thanks in part to the efforts of the Chinese Navy ships, piracy in those waters is being effectively curbed and maritime security along that route is being safeguarded," Liu said.
Vice Admiral Sir Philip Andrew Jones commended the task forces' operations in the Gulf of Aden, saying: "The Royal Navy and your navy are working to a common purpose here, and I look forward with excitement to future opportunities we will have to collaborate on in similar missions. This is why these visits you make are so important as they help us to understand each other better."
China Military Online says that since late 2008 the Chinese Navy has dispatched 18 task forces to execute escort missions on a regular and continuing basis. They have safely escorted 6,000 Chinese and foreign ships, and successfully rescued, protected and helped more than 60 Chinese and foreign ships.
The navy has also conducted other missions, including searching for the Malaysian Airlines flight 370 that went missing last March and helping the Philippines and Indonesia with disaster relief.

⚓️China pitches S-26T submarine for Royal Thai Navy contract ⚓️

A Chinese Yuan-class submarine. (Internet photo)
A Chinese Yuan-class submarine. (Internet photo)
The state-run China Shipbuilding Industry Corporation officially introduced its S-26T submarine to the defense ministry of Thailand on Jan. 12 to strengthen the military-to-military relationship between Beijing and Bangkok, according to Duowei News, an outlet operated by overseas Chinese.
After the decommissioning of the Royal Thai Navy's four Matchanu-class submarines, the nation has not operated submarines for more than 60 years. Now, however, some officials in the country's military government believe submarines are needed to defend the nation's freedom of navigation in the Gulf of Thailand. To rebuild its submarine fleet, the government decided to buy two or three submarines in Fiscal year 2016. China is the third nation to demonstrate interest in selling submarines to Thailand, after France and South Korea. 
By selling submarines to Thailand, China aims to gain a potential political and defense partner in South China Sea disputes with its neighbors at a time when Vietnam is also purchasing Kilo-class submarines from Russia.
Over the past 20 years, Thailand had signed contracts with Germany and South Korea to buy new submarines and considered buying S-20 submarines from China. These plans all fell through however due to repeated economic and political crises. As tensions escalate between rival claimants in the disputed South China Sea, Thailand has begun to feel that submarines are once again important to defend its national security, even though the country itself does not make territorial claims in the sea.
While the S-20 is the export version of the Type 039A Yuan-class diesel-electric submarine, the full details of the S-26T remain mysterious but its main competitor for the Royal Thai Navy's contract will be South Korea's Chang Bogo-class submarine.

FIJI HOLDS COMMEMORATION SERVICE FOR WWI FIJI CONTINGENT

FIJI HOLDS COMMEMORATION SERVICE FOR WWI FIJI CONTINGENT 



His Excellency the President Ratu Epeli Nailatikau led the nation today in commemorating the 1st Fiji Contingent to World War 1 at the National War Memorial site in Veiuto, Suva.

Family representatives of the 1st and 2nd Fiji Contingent and Fiji Labour Corps were in attendance at the service held this morning to commemorate those who had lost their lives in the First World War.

As part of the program, His Excellency read out the Roll of Honour of those 124 soldiers who served in the First Fiji Contingent in World War 1.

Fiji’s first contingent was made up of 57 Fijians who departed for Britain on December 31, 1914. The second contingent of 64 men were sent for battle in 1915 with two smaller groups of reinforcement arriving in Britain in 1916 and 1917. A third Fiji contingent formed in 1918 arrived in Auckland for training but never saw action as the Armistice was signed in 1918.

The Hon. Minister for Immigration, National Security and Defence, Timoci Natuva saidthis was the first time for Fiji to commemorate 100 years of the First World War.

“This year in August, in the presence of His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales, a commemorative service was held at the Glasgow Cathedral, Scotland to mark the centenary of the First World War. His Excellency the President represented Fiji and laid a wreath at the Cenotaph in George Square,” Minister Natuva said.

Minister Natuva said His Excellency also travelled to Ypres, Belgium and visited the war cemetery in Menin Gate, where 15 Fijians are remembered with honour.

The President of Returned Soldiers and Ex-servicemen Association (RSEA), Major Vanavasa Vakacegu commended the Fijian Government for commemorating those that sacrificed their lives in the First World War.

“I’m glad to witness the commemoration of the First Fiji Contingent to World War One. I thank the Government for remembering the fallen soldiers,” Vakacegu said. 

Tragic First World War tale of two brothers killed on the same day

Tragic First World War tale of two brothers killed on the same day

Ernest Murton, left, and his younger brother Bertie, who both died on the same day in World War One in 1915, when they were in the Norfolk Regiment. Picture: DENISE BRADLEYErnest Murton, left, and his younger brother Bertie, who both died on the same day in World War One in 1915, when they were in the Norfolk Regiment. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY
Thursday, January 15, 2015
8:38 AM
Two brothers who were killed on the same day in the First World War are among the fallen soldiers whose sacrifices are being preserved in an online roll of honour.

Norfolk and Suffolk’s First World War online roll of honour

Archant, the publisher of the Norwich Evening News and the Eastern Daily Press, launched the interactive site so that readers are able to add biographical details about individuals, as well as photographs, and can also post tributes.
It is the first time such a database has been assembled online and the project forms a major part of the Archant daily newspapers’ ongoing coverage of the centenary of the conflict.
Archant Norfolk editor-in-chief, Nigel Pickover, said: “Our website is part of our commitment to enduring remembrance of those who left our region never to return.
“In print we have produced amazing supplements, online we are creating a permanent record so people from our treasured part of the world can remember the lost ones for ever more. Through all this we are trying to capture the first, full, electronic record of those who lost their lives. My team is committed to the project and is leading it from the heart as well as the head.”
The memorial websites can be found at www.eveningnews24.co.uk/first-world-war-memorial
Ernest and Bertie Murton were both fighting with the Norfolk Regiment at the Battle of Loos when they died on October 13, 1915.
Ernest was a Lance Corporal and was just 28 when he died, leaving behind his wife Alice and their two-year-old daughter Irene, who lived at Lawson Road in Norwich at the time.
His brother, Bertie, a private, was 21 when he was killed and his home address was Turner’s Court, St Benedict’s, Norwich.
Hellesdon man Graham Cutting decided to upload photographs and information about his grandfather Ernest and great uncle Bertie to the Eastern Daily Press’ online roll of honour, which lists the 25,000 brave Norfolk and Suffolk men who lost their lives in the First World War.
Irene Cutting, aged 101, and her son Graham, with a photograph of Irene's father Ernest Murton, and his younger brother Bertie, who both died on the same day in World War One in 1915, when they were in the Norfolk Regiment. Picture: DENISE BRADLEYIrene Cutting, aged 101, and her son Graham, with a photograph of Irene's father Ernest Murton, and his younger brother Bertie, who both died on the same day in World War One in 1915, when they were in the Norfolk Regiment. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY
Mr Cutting, 68, from St Andrew’s Road, said: “I just thought I would put it all on there, after my wife saw it in the paper. They died on the same day and neither of them were ever found.
“Whether they were together or not when they died I don’t know.
“My mother was two at the time of her father’s death and she’s now 101. She didn’t really know him, and what she did know about him she heard from her mother. I think that they should be remembered, it was a big sacrifice.”
Ernest worked for Eastern Counties Newspapers, the company which published the Eastern Daily Press and Norwich Evening News before it became known as Archant and he is listed on the company’s memorial at its headquarters at Prospect House in Rouen Road, Norwich.
Mr Cutting said he believed Ernest worked in the print side of the business, possibly as a type-setter.
He said another brother, Sidney, survived the war, while another brother was too young to be involved.
Do you have a story relating to the First World War? Email ww1@archant.co.uk

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