Saturday, April 2, 2016

Forgotten Medal of Honor recipient gets funeral honors 66 years later - Emil Fredreksen USS Bennington (PG4)

 

Forgotten Medal of Honor recipient gets funeral honors 66 years later

Forgotten Medal of Honor recipient gets funeral honors 66 years later

Sailors assigned to Naval Base Kitsap Funeral Honors Detail fire a 21 gun salute during a funeral honor service for Chief Watertender Emil Fredreksen (Photo: U.S. Navy)

Danish-born Emil Fredreksen was the recipient of a rare peacetime Medal of Honor in 1906, but died alone and was left in an unmarked grave in Washington until this month.

Fredreksen emigrated to the U.S. in his youth and volunteered for the Navy in 1897. On the morning of July 21, 1905, his ship, the gunboat USS Bennington, suffered a catastrophic boiler explosion that killed or seriously wounded more than half of the ship’s crew in what was considered at the time the worst peacetime disaster in the service’s history.

For “extraordinary heroism displayed at the time of the explosion” Fredreksen was bestowed the Medal of Honor in 1906.

Continuing his service, he retired from the Navy in 1930 and died in 1950 with no known next of kin.

Fredreksen was buried in an unmarked grave with no headstone in Section R, Lot 0609, Grave 12, at the Evergreen Washelli Cemetery in Seattle, Washington and had remained that way until March 25 when an honor guard of bluejackets from nearby Naval Base Kitsap fired a salute over Chief Watertender Emil Fredreksen’s newly installed military marker as part of a graveside service.

The Washington State Department of Veterans Affairs, the U.S. Navy, Gov. Jay Inslee’s office and the Medal of Honor Historical Society of the United States coordinated the service.

“Throughout our country’s history, courageous men and women of the Evergreen State have answered the call to protect and defend justice, liberty and the freedom we hold so precious,” said David Bloch of Inslee’s office during the ceremony. “Rising above the call of duty, at the risk of grave injury and loss of life the celebrated few of these fearless service members distinguish themselves as heroes in the eyes of there comrades.”

(Photo: Find A Grave) http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=pv&GRid=66822441&PIpi=137405803

(Photo: Find A Grave)

VAOIG-Administrative Summaries of Investigation Regarding Wait Times - California

The Department of Veterans Affairs, Office of Inspector General (OIG), conducted extensive work related to allegations of wait time manipulation after the allegations at the Phoenix VA Health Care System in April 2014. Since that event and through fiscal year 2015, we have received numerous allegations related to wait time manipulation at VA facilities nationwide from veterans, VA employees, and Members of Congress that were investigated by OIG criminal investigators.



As we stated at Congressional hearings, at this time the OIG has completed 77 criminal investigations related to wait times and provided information to VA’s Office of Accountability Review for appropriate action. It has always been our intention to release information regarding the findings of these investigations at a time when doing so would not impede any planned prosecutive or administrative action. OIG will begin a rolling publication of these administrative summaries of investigation by state so that veterans and Congress have a complete picture of the work completed in their state. As other reviews are completed, we intend to post them to our website.



You may view and download these administrative summaries of investigation by clicking on the link to our webpage at www.va.gov/oig/publications/administrative-summaries-of-investigation.asp and selecting the appropriate state. The individual summaries may also be accessed by selecting the weblinks below.






VA OIG Administrative Summary of Investigation at the Los Angeles CA VA Medical Center (14-02890-236)

VA OIG Administrative Summary of Investigation at the Palo Alto CA VA Medical Center (14-02890-224)

VA OIG Administrative Summary of Investigation at the San Diego CA VA Medical Center (14-02890-247)

VA OIG Administrative Summary of Investigation at the San Diego CA VA Medical Center (14-02890-227)



Please use either Adobe Acrobat Reader version 8 or equivalent PDF reader software to open and view our reports. Adobe Acrobat Reader may be obtained free of charge from Adobe's website. Vision-impaired customers and those with text-only browsers may want to try Access Adobe for converting PDF documents into text. (Our disclaimer for these software products).

VAOIG-Administrative Summary of Investigation Regarding Wait Times - Georgia

The Department of Veterans Affairs, Office of Inspector General (OIG), conducted extensive work related to allegations of wait time manipulation after the allegations at the Phoenix VA Health Care System in April 2014. Since that event and through fiscal year 2015, we have received numerous allegations related to wait time manipulation at VA facilities nationwide from veterans, VA employees, and Members of Congress that were investigated by OIG criminal investigators.



As we stated at Congressional hearings, at this time the OIG has completed 77 criminal investigations related to wait times and provided information to VA’s Office of Accountability Review for appropriate action. It has always been our intention to release information regarding the findings of these investigations at a time when doing so would not impede any planned prosecutive or administrative action. OIG will begin a rolling publication of these administrative summaries of investigation by state so that veterans and Congress have a complete picture of the work completed in their state. As other reviews are completed, we intend to post them to our website.



You may view and download these administrative summaries of investigation by clicking on the link to our webpage at www.va.gov/oig/publications/administrative-summaries-of-investigation.asp and selecting the appropriate state. The individual summary may also be accessed by selecting the weblink below.





VA OIG Administrative Summary of Investigation at the Dublin GA VA Medical Center (14-03048-226)



Your First Look at the Pentagon’s New Unmanned Sub Chaser By Mike Schuler on Mar 31

Sub chaser

The U.S. Department of Defense has released the first footage of its prototype unmanned anti-submarine ship being developed to track quiet diesel-electric submarines over long distances. The new vessel was launched in January at Vigor’s shipyard in Portland, Oregon, where it has quietly been under construction for the Pentagon’s Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). During a speed […]

The post Your First Look at the Pentagon’s New Unmanned Sub Chaser appeared first on gCaptain.

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Thursday, March 31, 2016

End of Near Century Old Naval Mystery Brings Family Together By Leanna Commins

(courtesy photo)

(courtesy photo)

WASHINGTON –Edward Wilson, a mere 19, was one of several African-American crewmembers aboard the USS Conestoga when it mysteriously disappeared at sea after it departed March 25, 1921, from San Francisco for Hawaii.

For nearly a century, what happened to the 56-member crew has been a puzzling footnote in U.S. Navy history. Williams’ relatives, Annika Cropper and Cynthia Thomas, barely knew he existed, much less his fate.

Now, the 95-year-old mystery has been solved. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) announced during a special memorial for its crew in Washington last week (March 23) it has found the shipwreck off the coast of San Francisco.

Ironically, the USS Conestoga was one of the first times African Americans were ever allowed on a Navy vessel, a retired general at the event said.

Cooper and Thomas were the only African Americans among the crowd of crewmembers’ families sitting in the memorial’s Naval Heritage Center.

Cropper, who works in Los Angeles, happened to be in Washington when NOAA reached out to inform her that the ship on which her great uncle disappeared so long ago had been found. She said she knew very little about Wilson, other than the fact he and her grandmother were close.

“My grandmother actually named one of her children Edward and called him Eddie,” she said. “I’m sure she always wondered what happened to him.”

Like Cropper, Thomas knew very little about her great-uncle. Her grandmother was only around 12-years-old when Wilson left for the Navy, she said. Still, Thomas said was very happy to find what she called closure because of NOAA’s discovery.

“The first thing I told NOAA when they notified me is that they gave me and my family the closure that was needed,” she said. “I just hate that [my grandmother] wasn’t here to hear it herself.”

Officials said they did not know the exact reason why the boat sank, but they speculated it could have been a storm.

The boat was bound for Tutuila, American Samoa, by way of Hawaii, officials said. The Navy didn’t know it was missing until it failed to arrive in Hawaii. The Navy carried out an expansive air and sea search, but only a battered lifeboat with the letter “C” on its bow was ever found, hundreds of miles off the expected course.

(courtesy photo)

(courtesy photo)

While NOAA could not provide much information on the personal lives of the crewmembers, NOAA Deputy Administrator and Vice Admiral Manson Brown spoke kindly of the crew and their legacy.

“To the officers and crew of Conestoga who slumber beneath the ocean waves, your names are now etched in our hearts,” Brown said. “Your legacy of service and sacrifice are forever recorded in the annals of American history. You will not be forgotten. Rest in peace, shipmates.”

Cropper said she didn’t anticipate feeling emotional at the event, despite the closure for her family, because she never knew Wilson, but, she said, she was wrong.

“When I got there, they gave me a nametag that has his photo on it, and I actually got emotional, because my grandmother was very close to him, and it’s a family history I don’t know much about,” she said.

Thomas said the fact that the black sailors were racial trailblazers was important to her.

“That was a real accomplishment for them to have been able to be a part of this event,” she said. “It made me feel as though he was a hero in a way, because that was a barrier he crossed that other African Americans now had the opportunity to follow.”

Perhaps one of the best parts of NOAA’s discovery for both Cropper and Thomas was the reconnection of family. The women, who are second cousins, met for the first time and vowed to bring their sides of the family together.

“I think this will actually bring about more unity in the family because Edward Wilson had multiple siblings, and I don’t know many of their families,” Cropper said. “I think this will bring the family closer, and I think everyone’s going to start connecting again.”

Thomas felt similarly, excited at the prospect of expanding her family.

“My mother also feels like we’ve found out information that was always a question in the back of our minds,” she said. “It took them 95 years, but the answers have been found and it’s done. It’s a closed door for us.”

Huntington Ingalls CEO Urges Speedup of U.S. Navy’s Next Amphibious Ship Program By Reuters on Mar 29, 2016

The amphibious transport dock ship USS San Antonio (LPD 17), which the new  LX(R) dock landing ships will be based on. U.S. Navy Photo

By Andrea Shalal WASHINGTON, March 29 (Reuters) – Huntington Ingalls Industries Inc Chief Executive Mike Petters urged the U.S. Navy to accelerate its new LX(R) dock landing ship program to fiscal 2018 from 2020 to avoid significant costs associated with restarting a production line. The production-line gap would occur when building of the LPD-28 warship […]

The post Huntington Ingalls CEO Urges Speedup of U.S. Navy’s Next Amphibious Ship Program appeared first on gCaptain.

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Growth spurt at S.D. national cemetery New Miramar National Cemetery director says rough spots will be smoothed Mugshot of Jeanette Steele

Rex Kern was recently named director of the Miramar and Fort Rosecrans national cemeteries. — K.C. Alfred

Just six years after opening, Miramar National Cemetery is now the seventh-busiest veterans cemetery in the United States, prompting an upgrade of the director’s position that might mean more stability in what’s been a revolving-door job.

New Director Rex Kern said the region’s second veterans cemetery has experienced growing pains, leading to a less-than-polished look.

The 56-year-old Navy veteran said his goal is to smooth out the bumps to shore up the “national shrine” status that is the yardstick for all U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs cemeteries.

OPEN HOUSE

Miramar National Cemetery will hold an April 6 open house for the public to meet the new director, Rex Kern, and tour the property.

WHEN: 10 a.m. to noon

WHERE: Miramar National Cemetery, 5795 Nobel Dr., San Diego

“As this facility grows, the burial rate grows with it,” said Kern, who took the director’s job March 1 after it was upgraded to a higher rung on the civil service ladder, an acknowledgment of the amount of activity.

Presently, more than 4,000 people are being laid to rest in San Diego veterans cemeteries each year.

“There’s going to be a lot more work here,” Kern said, from his office overseeing the sweeping Miramar property.

Nationally, the VA asked for a 5 percent increase in the 2017 National Cemetery Administration budget as it continues a building spree to expand access to burial.

It’s the largest growth spurt since the Civil War for veterans cemeteries, driven by the death rate of World War II, Korea and Vietnam vets.

The request for $286.2 million will underwrite construction of two new national cemeteries, in western New York and southern Colorado, and additions to properties in Jacksonville, Fla., and Southern Florida.

Miramar, which opened in 2010 and accepted its first casket burial in April 2011, is 313 acres carved out of brush-covered hills on the western edge of Miramar Marine Corps Air Station. The first phase cost $23 million.

It was built after a long lobbying effort by San Diego County veterans who were unhappy about the lack of nearby national cemetery space for burials.

Iconic Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery, with sweeping ocean views from atop Point Loma, is out of real estate. It has been closed to most caskets since 1966. The last open niches for urns were spoken forl as of May 2014.

Still, Rosecrans usually wins the popularity vote over Miramar.

The foundation that fought for the additional cemetery praised the new director.

“Our board of directors is extremely pleased to have Rex, with his extensive operational experience, here in San Diego,” said Dennis Schoville, president of the Miramar National Cemetery Support Foundation.

Kern, who oversees both properties in his new job, acknowledges his public opinion challenge with Miramar.

“Obviously, we are a new facility. People like Fort Rosecrans more,” Kern said. “So I’m trying to promote Miramar and let them know this facility can be just as prestigious as Fort Rosecrans in future years. These are hallowed grounds.”

During a recent tour of the Miramar, the 56-year-old Navy veteran pointed to tall brown fences that wall off temporary equipment storage. Also, construction vehicles have worn dirt trails through the natural landscape.

As the backdrop for graceful rows of headstones, it’s not exactly pretty.

“We still have some areas that, in my opinion, look kind of rough,” Kern said. “That’s what we are going to concentrate on.”

One new addition will be a 30-foot bell tower slated to become a visual focal point of the property.

Called a carillon, the Veterans Tribute Tower will house a 250-pound bell that can be tolled by hand or electronically. It will also play patriotic music for ceremonie

Wednesday, March 30, 2016

SPOTD: U.S. Coast Guard’s Best Photos of 2016 – The Sweet 16

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Today’s ship photos come to us from the U.S. Coast Guard’s Sweet 16 of the 2016 #ShutterShootout photo competition! Head over to the U.S. Coast Guard’s facebook page to vote for your favorite Coast Guard photo of 2016. Cadets at the U.S. Coast Guard Academy conduct morning colors as snow falls on campus Feb. 5, 2016. Cadets conduct morning colors every morning […]

The post SPOTD: U.S. Coast Guard’s Best Photos of 2016 – The Sweet 16appeared first on gCaptain.

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Emil Fredreksen Receives Medal of Honor - USS BENNINGTON (PG4)

Medal of Honor Ceremony

Download High Resolution View All Photos 1 of 5 >

160325-N-MN975-002 SEATTLE, Wash. (March 25, 2016) - The Medal of Honor flag waves in the wind during a funeral honor service for Chief Watertender Emil Fredreksen at Washelli Veteran's Memorial Cemetery. Fredreksen, a Medal of Honor recipient, passed away over 60 years ago and bared an unmarked gravesite until researchers found a military funeral service was not held for his bravery and courage while serving his country. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Justin A. Johndro/Released)




Emil Fredreksen Receives Medal of Honor


Story Number: NNS160329-03Release Date: 3/29/2016 9:47:00 AM

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By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Joseph E. Montemarano, Navy Public Affairs Support Element, Det. Northwest

SEATTLE (NNS) -- Medal of Honor recipient Chief Watertender Emil Fredreksen was finally given proper military honors during a ceremony at the Evergreen Washelli Cemetery in Seattle, March 25.

Fredreksen, a Navy veteran who passed away more than 60 years ago, was a recipient of the rare peacetime Medal of Honor. With a service record that encompasses time on more than 20 ships, he is most notably defined by his time on USS Bennington (PG-4), Gunboat 4.

On July 21, 1905, the ship was preparing to sail from San Diego to Panama when at 10:33 a.m., one of its boilers exploded due to an over pressured valve. Records of the incident state that "the ship shook violently for several seconds, large volumes of steam and ashes filling most of the living compartments and deck space." With a total death toll of 66 and 46 severely injured, it was considered the worst peacetime disaster the Navy had seen. He, along with 10 others, was awarded the Medal of Honor for "extraordinary heroism displayed in the line of duty."

"Throughout our country's history, courageous men and women of the Evergreen State have answered the call to protect and defend justice, liberty and the freedom we hold so precious," said David Bloch, on behalf of Washington Gov. Jay Inslee. "Rising above the call of duty, at the risk of grave injury and loss of life the celebrated few of these fearless service members distinguish themselves as heroes in the eyes of there comrades."

Fredreksen's career eventually brought him to Washington state where, after 33 years of service, he would retire in 1930 from the Naval Reserve. He passed away in 1950 with no ceremony or headstone.

With no known next of kin, the hero was buried and all but forgotten until only recently, said Skip Dreps, of the Veterans Memorial Cemetery Board of Trustees.

Through the research of members from the Medal of Honor Historical Society of the United States, Fredreksen, received proper burial honors and a headstone will be placed upon his grave.

"Eleven survivors were awarded our nation's highest honor that day, and as the single event in military history where so many Medals of Honor were issued in peacetime, " said Dreps. "Yet there was only a single undetailed line about their heroism."

Fredreksen is now the seventh Medal of Honor recipient to be buried at the Evergreen Washelli Cemetery.

The rendering of military funeral honors is a way to show the nation's deep gratitude to those who, in times of war and peace, have faithfully defended the country. This ceremonial paying of respect is the final demonstration a grateful nation can provide to the veteran's family. Honoring those who served is the military's commitment to recognize the sacrifice and contributions of our nation's veterans.

For more news from Navy Public Affairs Support Element, visit http://www.navy.mil/local/npasehq/.


 

Monday, March 28, 2016

Celebrations of Easter: From our collection

Celebrations of Easter: From our collection

Easter in our collection

Easter in our collection

How did you spend your Easter Sunday? Hopefully you won the Easter egg hunt, had a delicious family barbeque or attended an Easter service. Today, we’re looking at several objects in the museum’s collection which explore the variety of ways Australians have celebrated Easter (and the long weekend).

If you live in Sydney you might have spent part of the long weekend at the Sydney Royal Easter Show. The Show is an annual event on the Sydney calendar, when the country meets the city. The aim of the show is to showcase the best agricultural produce from around the state. A true family event, a day at the show offers children a chance to get up-close to farm animals great and small: from freshly hatched chicks to horses and even alpacas. Of course, a day at the show is incomplete without a showbag.

The first show was held in 1823, at Parramatta by the Agricultural Society of New South Wales. One of the society’s central missions was to stage an annual competitive display of animals and produce, intended to increase the quality of Australia’s produce through competition. It wasn’t until 1882 that the show found a home at Moore Park, where it would continue to grow in popularity and become a regular part of the Sydney calendar. In 1998 the show was moved to its current location at Sydney Olympic Park, Homebush.

The judging of the Aberdeen Argus bulls competition, circa 1935. ANMM Collection 00012720.Judging at the 1935 Sydney Royal Easter ShowJudging at the 1935 Sydney Royal Easter Show. ANMM Collection 00012716.

These images come from the Hall collection and showcase the animal judging at the 1935 Royal Easter Show. William James Hall was a prominent Sydney-based maritime and animal photographer, from the 1890s to the 1930s. Most of Hall’s glass plate negatives are of sailing ships and sailing related activities of Sydney Harbour, in his later years Hall was in demand as a livestock photographer at regional agricultural shows.

The fine weather this weekend no doubt encouraged many family outings to the beach. In the 1920s and 30s, the beach was a great place to find entertainment. Not only in the water, but also on the pier.

Beatrice Kerr in her trademark swimsuit. ANMM Collection ANMS1030[046].

Beatrice Kerr in her trademark swimsuit. ANMM Collection ANMS1030[046].

This handbill for the City Baths promotes Beatrice Kerr’s diving performance for Easter Monday and Tuesday. The local pools and piers were centers for fitness and entertainment during this period. Leisure and sport were blossoming hobbies of the age and Miss Kerr’s fame as a diver was symbolic of this. She and her contemporaries (including Annette Kellerman, Fanny Durak and Mina Wylie) inspired young women of the age to venture into the water through their displays of defying diving routines, first aid demonstrations and attempts to break swimming records.
Easter program at North Pier, 1911 with Beatrice Kerr performing. ANMM Collection ANMS1026[079].

Easter program at North Pier, 1911 with Beatrice Kerr performing. ANMM Collection ANMS1026[079].

Miss Kerr’s career as an aquatic performer lead to her touring England, from 1911 onwards. During this tour she often wore the shell embroidered swimsuit pictured above. Her choice of swimsuit was for practical reasons: echoing the cut of men’s swimsuits of the age, allowing greater arm movement and made from a lighter fabric than women’s suits of the time.

Sunday, March 27, 2016

Mutiny on the Brisbane River as wayward captain Henry Wright of the Gayundah refuses to leave



The Gayundah, named for an Aboriginal word for lightning, could reach the astonishing speed of 10.5 knots (19.5km/h). Pice: The Courier-Mail photo archive

TWENTY-TWO heavily armed policemen race to the bank of the Brisbane River as the highest-ranking naval officer in Queensland prepares for a daring getaway.
Captain Henry Townley Wright has commandeered a navy gunship and as the police aim their rifles at him, he asks one of his men about firing a cannon at Parliament House.
The English skipper is refusing to hand over the Queensland Navy’s floating fortress, the Gayundah, and police rifles are cocked.

British gunboats Paluma (front) and Gayundah (rear). Pic: State Library of Queensland

The incident known as the Mutiny on the Gayundah took place on the Brisbane River on the afternoon of October 25, 1888 as a crowd of thousands gathered on the bank to watch the shootout.
Long before Vladimir Putin dreamt of rebuilding the Russian Empire, the warships of Tsar Alexander III were frequent visitors in the South Pacific and colonial governments were convinced invasion was imminent.
New coastal forts were built around Australia, including Fort Lytton, to guard the mouth of the Brisbane River.  With the Australian colonies providing their own navies, the Queensland Maritime Defence Force paid £35,000 each for two British gunboats.
The ships were both 40m long, 8.5m wide and weighed 350 tonnes. Gayundah, an aboriginal word for lightning, could reach a then-astonishing speed of 10.5 knots (19.5km/h).

The reckless Captain Henry Townley Wright tried to take over the gunship.

The second ship, Paluma, (meaning thunder) was used to survey the Great Barrier Reef.
HMQS Gayundah left Newcastle-on-Tyne under the command of Captain Henry Townley Wright, ex-Royal Navy, on November 13, 1884 and arrived in the Queensland capital on March 27, 1885.
After a few months it became obvious the Russians weren’t coming after all, and Gayundahspent much of her time anchored opposite the Botanic Gardens.
Wright, who spent much of his time playing cricket, overspent his lavish salary of £600 a year, had big debts for wine and spirits and was said to be pilfering the ship’s crockery. Residents of Kangaroo Point feared rowdy members of his crew.
Queensland finally asked Wright to go home. He wanted his salary and leave in advance but the government refused. Instead, he was ordered to pass command to his First Lieutenant, Francis Taylor.

First lieutenant Francis Pringle Taylor was arrested by Captain Wright.

Wright protested that since his ship flew the flag of the White Ensign he was under the command of the Royal Navy and not Queensland.
Wright had his crew arrest Taylor and prepared to take theGayundah to Sydney. As police gathered to stop him, Wright casually asked his gunner where he’d aim the aft cannon to hit Parliament House.
A boarding party led by Police Commissioner David Thompson Seymour finally arrested Wright at gunpoint, theBrisbane Courierremarking that throughout the Captain was “perfectly cool and collected”.
Wright protested long and loud about the way Queensland had treated him and stayed on his high horse for a while as boss of the new Brisbane Sports and Pony Club at Breakfast Creek before returning to England.

The Gayundah now lies rusting on the beach at Woody Point at Redcliffe.

In 1903 Gayundah was used for the first ship-to-shore wireless telegraphy experiments in Australia and during World War I was a guard ship in Australian waters.
In 1921 she became a sand and gravel barge in Moreton Bay and was eventually beached as a breakwater off the Woody Point cliffs near Redcliffe in 1958.
Her huge rusty skeleton remains a local attraction.
The anniversary of Gayundah arriving in Brisbane will be celebrated tomorrow week with the premiere at 2pm of the 75-minute Richard Lancaster film Mutiny of the Gayundah at the Redcliffe Cultural Centre. Tickets are $8.
Grantlee Kieza is the author of 11 Books. His bestseller Monash details the work of General Sir John Monash and others in preparing for the Russian threat in the 1880s.

TAPS-Staff Sgt. Louis F. Cardin, USMC - Fallen Marine’s Remains Returned To Riverside County

English: United States Marine Corps flag with ...
English: United States Marine Corps flag with fringe (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
RIVERSIDE (CBSLA.com) — The remains of a U.S. Marine from Temecula killed in Iraq during an Islamic State attack were returned to Riverside County Saturday.
The casket bearing the body of 27-year-old Staff Sgt. Louis F. Cardin arrived at about 1 p.m. at March Air Reserve Base, following a flight from Dover Air Force Base in Delaware, according to published reports.
Cardin’s body will be taken to Hemet in preparation for a public service at Temecula City Hall Friday, city officials confirmed.
Cardin is scheduled to be interred at Riverside National Cemetery.
The Chaparral High School alumnus was among several hundred Marines who recently deployed to a fire support base near Makhmour, in northern Iraq, as part of Operation Inherent Resolve, according to military officials. The objective is to dislodge Islamic State fighters from Mosul, which is under siege by Kurdish forces.
The base came under attack by Islamic State fighters last Saturday and Cardin was mortally wounded, according to the Department of Defense.
“Cardin’s service and his many important contributions will long be remembered by his fellow Marines, his teammates at United States Central Command and a grateful nation,” Army Gen. Lloyd J. Austin said earlier this week.
Fallen Marine

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