Saturday, July 30, 2016

Photographer’s Mate at Work [feedly]



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Photographer's Mate at Work
// Naval History Blog

Occasionally one will encounter a headline touting a "major archival discovery," or something of that nature, though some may disagree with that assessment. But discoveries come from synthesizing information in a new way to reveal a certain truth, and in that vein we find today's post. The Photography Collection of Photographer's Mate Alfred "Alf" Joseph Sedivi (1915-1945) at the U.S. Naval Institute Photo Archive, consists of approximately 1,650 prints donated by Nickie Lancaster, Sedivi's niece. The collection includes images of the aftermath of the battles on Tinian, Saipan, Guam, Tarawa, and Iwo Jima as well as many showing shipboard life... Read the rest of this entry »
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Expand and Enhance Your World War II Research and Knowledge [feedly]


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Expand and Enhance Your World War II Research and Knowledge
// Ancestry.com Blog

Are you stuck in your World War II research and unsure where to go next? Have you exhausted all of the resources on Ancestry.com trying to answer the questions you have about your soldier's service? Have you taken the time to explore record sets which do not answer specific questions about your soldier? Record sets Read More
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Secretary Mabus Names Destroyer for Medal of Honor Recipient [feedly]



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Secretary Mabus Names Destroyer for Medal of Honor Recipient
// U.S. Navy News Top Stories

In a ceremony at Marine Barracks in Washington, D.C., July 28, Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced Arleigh—Burke class destroyer DDG 124 will be named Harvey C. Barnum Jr. in honor of the retired U.S. Marine Corps colonel who received the Medal of Honor for valor during the Vietnam War.
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This Day In Naval History - July 29 [feedly]



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This Day In Naval History - July 29
// Maritime News - Maritime & Shipbuilding News

1846 - During the Mexican-American War, a detachment of Marines and Sailors, led by Arm. Col. John C. Fremont from the sloop USS Cyane, commanded by Cmdr. Samuel F.
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Athletes’ village designed by Nazi leader for 1936 Berlin Games lies crumbling | Daily Mail Online

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3714783/Athletes-village-designed-Nazi-leader-1936-Games-lies-crumbling-outskirts-Berlin.html

The successes and dysfunctions of World War II intelligence operations



J. Furman Daniel, III  is a visiting professor at George Washington University. He is the editor of the forthcoming book, “21st Century Patton: Leadership Lessons for the Modern Era.”

In his ambitious new book, “The Secret War,” veteran historian Max Hastings delves into the intelligence operations of the competiting powers of World War II: the United States, Britain, Russia, Germany and Japan. Hastings does not set out to be exhaustive but rather to deliver “a study of both sides’ secret war machines and some of the characters who influenced them.” The true value-added of the book is that it provides warnings about the ambiguous role of clandestine activities that remain relevant today.

While Hastings finds faults with the U.S. and British intelligence services, he shows that they were able to overcome rivalries and biases to produce accurate and honest assessments that influenced key decision-makers. Hastings credits Winston Churchill’s leadership for much of the Allied success. More than any other leader, Churchill recognized the value of intelligence and ensured that the British services were properly resourced, apolitical and successfully managed.

The author is highly critical of the German and Soviet intelligence services, which suffered under oppressive regimes that did not tolerate dissenting opinions. Flaws within the German system were ignored as the Nazis marched to rapid victories in the early years of the war and were exacerbated as Hitler became increasingly surrounded by incompetent sycophants who hid or manipulated the truth. By contrast, Soviet intelligence suffered some catastrophic early failures but improved after Stalin ceded much of the control to a more competent cadre of professionals. Still, Soviet intelligence struggled to overcome the legacy of the Stalinist purges, the shock of the Nazi invasion and the perpetual fear of Allied betrayal.

Hastings acknowledges that intelligence and covert action were not responsible for the outcome of the war. Rather, physical dominance was the guarantor of victory. British code-breaking was the most important intelligence activity, but victory came only because the Western Allies had “absolute command of sea and air.”

"The Secret War: Spies, Ciphers, and Guerrillas, 1939-1945" by Max Hastings (Harper)

Despite its many virtues, the book is long — more than 550 pages of text — and jumps rapidly among different theaters, missions and personalities. At times, Hastings focuses disproportionately on the European theater and British contributions. Nonetheless, in its nuanced and complex portrait of dysfunction, mistrust and waste, “The Secret War” sets a new benchmark for books on intelligence and covert action in World War II.

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Monday, July 25, 2016

Watch: Decommissioned Navy Ship Gets Bombarded with Missiles And Torpedoes in Live Fire Sinking Exercise [feedly]



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Watch: Decommissioned Navy Ship Gets Bombarded with Missiles And Torpedoes in Live Fire Sinking Exercise
// gCaptain.com

Screen Shot 2016-07-20 at 5.25.53 PMHere is the decommissioned USS Thach (FFG 43) getting bombarded with missiles and torpedoes during Rim of the Pacific 2016 live fire sinking exercise held July 14, 2016. Participants in the exercise include U.S., Canada, Australia, and the Republic of Korea. Twenty-six nations, more than 40 ships and submarines, more than 200 aircraft, and 25,000 personnel are […]

The post Watch: Decommissioned Navy Ship Gets Bombarded with Missiles And Torpedoes in Live Fire Sinking Exercise appeared first on gCaptain.


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U.S. Ship Visit to End Anti-Nuclear Impasse With New Zealand [feedly]



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U.S. Ship Visit to End Anti-Nuclear Impasse With New Zealand
// gCaptain.com

The guided missile destroyer USS Donald Cook (DDG 75). File photo: U.S. NavyBy Matthew Brockett (Bloomberg) — The U.S. Navy will send a ship to New Zealand later this year, ending an impasse over the country's anti-nuclear policy dating back to the 1980s. Visiting U.S. Vice President Joe Biden accepted an invitation to send a ship to the Royal New Zealand Navy's 75th anniversary in November, Prime […]

The post U.S. Ship Visit to End Anti-Nuclear Impasse With New Zealand appeared first on gCaptain.


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Maritime Monday for July 25th, 2016 [feedly]



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Maritime Monday for July 25th, 2016
// gCaptain.com

Maritime Monday July 25th, 2016A Graphic Guide to All the Weird Things in New York City's Waterways Atlas Obscura's Underwater Week One of Miss Monkey's favoritest blogs has just done an Underwater Week. Click their logo to the right to go peruse over 70 articles on all that is weird and wonderful in the under water world! What follows […]

The post Maritime Monday for July 25th, 2016 appeared first on gCaptain.


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NASSCO Bags USS Oak Hill Modification Award [feedly]



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NASSCO Bags USS Oak Hill Modification Award
// Maritime News - Maritime & Shipbuilding News

General Dynamics NASSCO-Norfolk was awarded a $42 million cost-plus-award-fee modification to a previously awarded contract for the repair and alteration for the USS Oak Hill (LSD-51).
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Sunday, July 24, 2016

USS Wahoo (SS 238) [feedly]



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USS Wahoo (SS 238)
// Vallejo Naval & Historical Museum

On this date in 1942 the submarine USS Wahoo (SS 238) was launched at Mare Island. Wahoo was the first sub launched at the Shipyard following the attack on Pearl Harbor. The Vallejo Times-Herald reported on the launching:

"Mare Island Navy Yard wrote new history [today]. A very dramatic history, too, with the launching of its first submarine since the declaration of war – the first submarine launched from the new building ways – the first submarine in the U.S. Navy to bear the name USS Wahoo.

"Nor did the sturdy Wahoo's 'firsts' escape the notice of Rear Admiral W. L. Friedell, commandant, who told assembled guests and workmen during the launch-ing ceremonies: 'With so many firsts to her credit, we may rest assured that Wahoo's officers and men will see to it that she is first in the performance of her missions and first in her credits for enemy craft.'

"It was another perfect launching for Mare Island. One second, gay flags flying over her decks, the Wahoo was poised high on the ways beside her sister ship, the Whale… another second and beautifully, down sailed Wahoo to the waters of Mare Island channel."

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Improved Coordination of HUMINT Collection Sought [feedly]



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Improved Coordination of HUMINT Collection Sought
// Secrecy News

The Director of National Intelligence issued — and last week published — a pair of Intelligence Community Directives (here and here) that aim to improve the coordination of human intelligence collection for foreign intelligence and counterintelligence purposes.

The directives are intended "to ensure the deconfliction, coordination, and integration of intelligence activities," including liaison with foreign intelligence services, in order "to significantly enhance the security of the nation by effectively and efficiently allocating resources."

The basic idea seems to be to make sure that HUMINT collection agencies are not stepping on each other's toes and that, to the contrary, they are actively assisting one another in their operations. The desired coordination "should not be pro forma," the directives both said. "It should include the timely exchange by IC elements of pertinent and necessary information to facilitate operational success."

See Coordination of Clandestine Human Source and Human-Enabled Foreign Intelligence Collection and Counterintelligence Activities Outside the United StatesIntelligence Community Directive 310, June 27, 2016, and

Coordination of Clandestine Human Source and Human-Enabled Foreign Intelligence Collection and Counterintelligence Activities Inside the United StatesIntelligence Community Directive 311, June 27, 2016.

The new Directives do not disclose any classified operations or intelligence methods. Yet they are revealing and interesting in several ways.

First, their public availability is a sign of the shifting boundaries of intelligence-related secrecy. The directives were prepared as unclassified documents and were made public on the ODNI website. By contrast, their precursor — Director of Central Intelligence Directive 5/1P on Espionage and Counterintelligence Activities Abroad(which is now rescinded) — was not publicly released.

Second, the new releases conform to and advance the DNI's transparency policy, which promised to increase public disclosure of the IC's "governance framework–the rules, authorities, compliance mechanisms, and oversight that guide its activities." This is not the stuff of headlines (except in Secrecy News). There is nothing scandalous about the directives; to non-specialists, they may actually be kind of boring. But they are part of an ongoing adaptation to public expectations of greater intelligence transparency. They also represent a notable step away from "secret law," i.e. the reliance on undisclosed mandates or internal regulations that are inaccessible to the public.

The directives, which feature lots of "if…, then…" clauses, show the emphatically rule-based character of much of intelligence policy. The directives were plainly written by lawyers. (A sample sentence: "For purposes of this Directive, the term 'coordination' is understood to encompass 'deconfliction' and 'integration'."). A human intelligence collector in the field may need a lawyer standing by to explain their full meaning and implications.

Apparently, though, this is nothing new.

When he joined the CIA in 1975, wrote former CIA attorney John Rizzo in his 2014 book Company Man, "I was struck by how much scope and impact CIA lawyers, even one as wet behind the ears as I was, had on the day-to-day mission of the Agency."

The post Improved Coordination of HUMINT Collection Sought appeared first on Federation Of American Scientists.


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Russia Foreign Intelligence Service Expands [feedly]



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Russia Foreign Intelligence Service Expands
// Secrecy News

The headquarters complex of the Foreign Intelligence Service (SVR) of the Russian Federation has expanded dramatically over the past decade, a review of open source imagery reveals.

Since 2007, several large new buildings have been added to SVR headquarters, increasing its floor space by a factor of two or more. Nearby parking capacity appears to have quadrupled, more or less.

The compilation of open source imagery was prepared by Allen Thomson. See Expansion of Russian Foreign Intelligence Service HQ (SVR; Former KGB First Main Directorate) Between 2007 and 2016, as of July 11, 2016.

Whether the expansion of SVR headquarters corresponds to changes in the Service's mission, organizational structure or budget could not immediately be learned.

Russian journalist and author Andrei Soldatov, who runs the Agentura.ru website on Russian security services, noted that the expansion "coincides with the appointment of the current SVR director, Mikhail Fradkov, in 2007." He recalled that when President Putin introduced Fradkov to Service personnel, he said that the SVR should endeavor to help Russian corporations abroad, perhaps indicating a new mission emphasis.

The post Russia Foreign Intelligence Service Expands appeared first on Federation Of American Scientists.


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Seeking Verifiable Destruction of Nuclear Warheads [feedly]



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Seeking Verifiable Destruction of Nuclear Warheads
// Secrecy News

A longstanding conundrum surrounding efforts to negotiate reductions in nuclear arsenals is how to verify the physical destruction of nuclear warheads to the satisfaction of an opposing party without disclosing classified weapons design information. Now some potential new solutions to this challenge are emerging.

Based on tests that were conducted by the Atomic Energy Commission in the 1960s in a program known as Cloudgap, U.S. officials determined at that time that secure and verifiable weapon dismantlement through visual inspection, radiation detection or material assay was a difficult and possibly insurmountable problem.

"If the United States were to demonstrate the destruction of nuclear weapons in existing AEC facilities following the concept which was tested, many items of classified weapon design information would be revealed even at the lowest level of intrusion," according to a 1969 report on Demonstrated Destruction of Nuclear Weapons.

But in a newly published paper, researchers said they had devised a method that should, in principle, resolve the conundrum.

"We present a mechanism in the form of an interactive proof system that can validate the structure and composition of an object, such as a nuclear warhead, to arbitrary precision without revealing either its structure or composition. We introduce a tomographic method that simultaneously resolves both the geometric and isotopic makeup of an object. We also introduce a method of protecting information using a provably secure cryptographic hash that does not rely on electronics or software. These techniques, when combined with a suitable protocol, constitute an interactive proof system that could reject hoax items and clear authentic warheads with excellent sensitivity in reasonably short measurement times," the authors wrote.

See Physical cryptographic verification of nuclear warheads by R. Scott Kemp, et al,Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, published online July 18.

More simply put, it's "the first unspoofable warhead verification system for disarmament treaties — and it keeps weapon secrets too!" tweeted Kemp.

See also reporting in Science Magazine, New Scientist, and Phys.org.

In another recent attempt to address the same problem, "we show the viability of a fundamentally new approach to nuclear warhead verification that incorporates a zero-knowledge protocol, which is designed in such a way that sensitive information is never measured and so does not need to be hidden. We interrogate submitted items with energetic neutrons, making, in effect, differential measurements of both neutron transmission and emission. Calculations for scenarios in which material is diverted from a test object show that a high degree of discrimination can be achieved while revealing zero information."

See A zero-knowledge protocol for nuclear warhead verification by Alexander Glaser, et al, Nature, 26 June 2014.

But the technology of nuclear disarmament and the politics of it are two different things.

For its part, the U.S. Department of Defense appears to see little prospect for significant negotiated nuclear reductions. In fact, at least for planning purposes, the Pentagon foresees an increasingly nuclear-armed world in decades to come.

A new DoD study of the Joint Operational Environment in the year 2035 avers that:

"The foundation for U.S. survival in a world of nuclear states is the credible capability to hold other nuclear great powers at risk, which will be complicated by the emergence of more capable, survivable, and numerous competitor nuclear forces. Therefore, the future Joint Force must be prepared to conduct National Strategic Deterrence. This includes leveraging layered missile defenses to complicate adversary nuclear planning; fielding U.S. nuclear forces capable of threatening the leadership, military forces, and industrial and economic assets of potential adversaries; and demonstrating the readiness of these forces through exercises and other flexible deterrent operations."

See The Joint Operating Environment (JOE) 2035: The Joint Force in a Contested and Disordered World, Joint Chiefs of Staff, 14 July 2016.

The post Seeking Verifiable Destruction of Nuclear Warheads appeared first on Federation Of American Scientists.


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Post-World War II Destroyer Escorts [feedly]



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Post-World War II Destroyer Escorts
// Naval Historical Foundation

USS RUDDEROW (DE-224) off the Philadelphia Navy Yard, 15 July 1944. (NHHC/Natl Archives Photo # 19-N-69262)

USS RUDDEROW (DE-224) off the Philadelphia Navy Yard, 15 July 1944. (NHHC/Natl Archives Photo # 19-N-69262)

By Captain George Stewart, USN (Ret.)

r>Destroyer Escort (DE) was the original US Navy classification for ships designed with endurance to escort mid-ocean convoys of merchant ships. During World War II their missions evolved into vital parts of hunter-killer groups where in combination with escort carriers (CVE) they were to play a significant role in winning the Battle of the Atlantic. The designation Destroyer Escort (DE) continuously applied to many post-war designs up until 1975 when they redesignated as frigates (FF) at the direction of the Chief of Naval Operations (CNO). Their primary functions were to defend against aircraft and detect, pursue, and attack submarines. The ships reached speeds ranging between 21 and 24 knots, therefore, they were unable to keep up with the fast carrier battle groups. However this speed was more than adequate for anti-submarine patrols, and the ships had a tighter turning radius than the fleet destroyers.

The original design was in response to a request from the United Kingdom under the Lend-Lease Act, which passed into law in March 1941. The UK asked the US to design, build, and supply an escort vessel that was suitable for anti-submarine warfare (ASW) in deep open ocean operations. The US came up with a design they referred to as the British Destroyer Escort (BDE). A little-known fact was that the first five ships of the class (DE 1, 2, 3, 4, and 12,) were transferred directly to the UK with this designation where they became the Captain-class Frigates. These ships, built at the Boston Navy Yard, all entered service in early 1943. The first ship to enter US Naval service as a DE was USS Evarts (DE 5) which entered service in April 1943. Over the next three years over 500 of these ships were built with 440 remaining in US service and a total of 78 transferred to the UK where they would serve as the Captain-class Frigates.  During the war, 95 DEs were converted into high-speed transports (APD).

(via NAVSOURCE)

(via NAVSOURCE)

There were six different ship classes built under this program. A significant difference between the ship classes was the use of four different propulsion systems which included:
  • Evarts & Cannon-classes: Diesel-Electric (GMT and DET) 6000 SHP – 144 ships
  • Buckley & Rudderow-classes: Steam Turbo-Electric (TE and TEV) 12,000 SHP – 124 ships
  • Edsall-class: Geared Fairbanks-Morse Diesel – (FMR) – 6000 SHP -85 ships
  • John C. Butler-class: (WGT) Westinghouse Geared Turbine, 12,000 SHP – 87 ships

In general, these ships all had similar hull characteristics. As a result of lessons learned with the first at 289.5 feet. Evarts-class ships, all of the remaining ships had 306 ft. lengths. Design displacement varied between 1430 and 1740 tons. In general, the steam powered ships (TE, TEV, and WGT) has designed speeds of 23 to 24 knots while the diesel powered ships (GMT, DET, and FMR) rated at 21 knots. On the other side of the coin, the diesel powered ships had high maintenance requirements and were subject to breakdowns. Another significant difference was that the main gun batteries on the Rudderow and John C. Butler-classes consisted of a pair of 5"/38 mounts while the earlier ship classes had three 3"/50 mounts.

The hunter-killer groups played a significant role in winning the Battle of the Atlantic. There has been a tendency to overlook their importance because the groups were no longer needed and most of the escort carriers were decommissioned because they could not handle more modern jet aircraft.  The remaining DEs were assigned to reserve training; anti-submarine coastal patrols and radar picket duties.  At least four turbo-electric drive ships came outfitted with amidships cable reels allowing them to serve as floating power stations. A separate article entitled "Going Ashore: Naval Ship to Shore Power for Humanitarian Services" described them. In the mid-1950s, twelve ships were converted into radar picket vessels (DERs) where they operated in conjunction with 16 Guardian-class radar picket ships (YAGR) which were converted from Liberty ships. Their mission was to extend the Distant Early Warning (DEW) line on both coasts. A total of 43 of the ships transferred to foreign navies under the Mutual Defense Assistance Program.

By the mid-1960s, most of the World War II DEs had been decommissioned. The last one to remain in active service was the Rudderow-class USS Parle (DE 708)  with was decommissioned in July 1970. Two ships are still in museum service: the USS Slater (DE 766) in Albany, NY and the USS Stewart (DE 238) in Galveston, Texas.

USS Parle (DE 708) The last in service (via NAVSOURCE)

USS Parle (DE 708) The last in service (via NAVSOURCE)

The first post-World War II escort ships built for the US Navy were the Dealey (DE 1006)-class destroyer escorts. These ships were only slightly larger than their predecessors. They had only a single screw driven by a geared steam turbine rated at 20,000 SHP. This addition gave them a design speed of 25 knots. They ship included twin three-inch guns, ASW rockets, and six depth charge launchers. The ships had a large bow mounted SQS 23 sonar dome and they had hangars and landing pads for drone anti-submarine helicopters (DASH). The 13 ships of the class entered service between 1954 and 1958. Unfortunately, the DASH helicopters proved to be very unreliable, and this contributed to the limited life of the class. All had been decommissioned by 1973. There were also four ships of the Claud Jones (DE 1033)-class that was essentially diesel powered versions of the Dealey-class ships. Four diesel engines driving a single screw rated at 9240 SHP propelled Dealey-class ships, which gave them a rated speed of 21-22 knots. These ships entered service between 1956 and 1959 and they only had limited service lives for the same reasons as their predecessors. All had been decommissioned by 1974.
(via NAVSOURCE)

(via NAVSOURCE)

The second generation of the post- World War II escorts was the Bronstein-class ships. These are considered by some to be developmental ships. They were substantially larger than all of their predecessors. However, only two ships of the class were built. The USS Bronstein (DE 1037) and the USS McCloy (DE 1038) entered service in 1963. They were re–designated as frigates (FF) in 1975. Both ships were decommissioned in 1990 and sold to the Mexican Navy. Garcia-class frigates succeeded them and were the last ships designed to handle the DASH drone helicopters, which by then had proven to be a failure due to their unreliability.
(via NAVSOURCE)

USS Garcia (via NAVSOURCE)

The Garcia (DE 1040)-class ships were a larger follow-on version of the two Bronstein-class ships. They incorporated some upgrades over the previous ship classes including the capability to accommodate the manned SH-2 LAMPS (Light Airborne Multi-Purpose System) helicopters. The ships were considerably larger than any of their predecessors being 414.5 ft. in length. The sing screw ships came equipped with large SQS 26 bow mounted sonar domes and fin stabilizers. Their armament consisted of a pair of single 5"/38 gun mounts, ASROC (Anti-Submarine Rockets) MK 32, and MK 37 torpedoes. The 11 ships of the class commissioned between 1964 and 1968 and they served up into the late 1980s. One ship of the class, the USS Glover (AGDE 1) commissioned as a research and development ship. There were six additional ships of the Brooke (DEG 1)-class which was virtually identical to the Garcia-class ships with the exception that they carried the Tarter Guided  Missile system, which replaced the after 5"/38 gun mount. Both ship types had 35,000 SHP single screw steam turbine plants which gave them a design speed of 27 knots. A feature peculiar to both classes was that they came with pressure-fired boilers which supplied steam at a design pressure of 1200 psi and a temperature of 950 Deg. F. These boilers fitted with supercharger units which consisted of a gas turbine which operated on exhaust gas driving an axial flow compressor which supplied combustion air to the boiler furnace at pressures up to approximately 70 psi. The superchargers fitted with auxiliary steam turbines were required to be used at low firing rates. The boilers were cylindrical in shape and equipped with top mounted burners. They took up far less space than conventional boilers of the same rating. Nevertheless, they were plagued with numerous problems due to reliability, logistics, and training and were never used on any subsequent ship classes. The follow on Knox (DE 1052)-class ships came fitted with conventional boilers. All of the Garcia and Brooke-class ships redesignated as Frigates (FF) in 1975.

In general, it can be stated the most significant problems encountered with all of the post-war designs up until this time were a failure of the DASH helicopter systems and difficulties with the pressure-fired boilers. The Knox (DE 1052)-class ships were a follow-on design which incorporated many of the lessons learned discussed in this paper. The purpose of this post was to review the factors that led up to the conception of the Knox-class ships. The Knox-class ships themselves will receive mention in depth in a later article. The 46 ships of the class constituted the largest group of ships commissioned in the post-World War era as Destroyer Escorts.

Post-World War II Destroyer Escorts was published by the Naval Historical Foundation and originally appeared on Naval Historical Foundation on July 19, 2016.


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Faces of the Fleet [feedly]



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Faces of the Fleet
// Navy Live

"Faces of the Fleet" is a collection of images of Sailors serving our country in the greatest and most technologically advanced Navy in the world. These fine men and women are leading from the deck plates and completing missions around the globe. This is your fleet and these are your Sailors! GO NAVY!

Naval Air Crewman (Helicopter) 3rd Class Sean Magee, assigned to the

Naval Air Crewman (Helicopter) 3rd Class Sean Magee, assigned to the "Blackjacks" of Helicopter Sea Combat (HSC) Squadron 21, is responsible for maintaining the aircraft during flight operation. Magee is deployed aboard hospital ship USNS Mercy (T-AH 19) in support of Pacific Partnership 2016. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Brittney Vella/Released)

 

Master at Arms 2nd Class Amber Boyd from Cleveland, Ohio, runs an obstacle with Military Working Dog (MWD) Omar. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Timothy M. Ahearn/Released)

Master at Arms 2nd Class Amber Boyd from Cleveland, Ohio, runs an obstacle with Military Working Dog (MWD) Omar. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Timothy M. Ahearn/Released)

 

 Naval Aircrewman (Helicopter) 1st Class John Jacops, left, and Chief Naval Aircrewman Shaun Daniels, assigned to Helicopter Mine Countermeasures Squadron (HM) 14, explain how the MK-104 acoustic minesweeping device functions to Rear Adm. Jim W. Kilby, Commander, Naval Surface and Mine Warfighting Development Center, during a tour of the squadron in support of the Southern California portion of Rim of the Pacific 2016. (U.S. Navy photo by Lt. Cmdr. Jeremy Braun/Released)

Naval Aircrewman (Helicopter) 1st Class John Jacops, left, and Chief Naval Aircrewman Shaun Daniels, assigned to Helicopter Mine Countermeasures Squadron (HM) 14, explain how the MK-104 acoustic minesweeping device functions to Rear Adm. Jim W. Kilby, Commander, Naval Surface and Mine Warfighting Development Center, during a tour of the squadron in support of the Southern California portion of Rim of the Pacific 2016. (U.S. Navy photo by Lt. Cmdr. Jeremy Braun/Released)

 

Seaman Marcus Padilla sounds the boatswain's pipe prior to making an announcement over the ship's announcement system aboard the Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Chancellorsville (CG 62). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Andrew Schneider/Released)

Seaman Marcus Padilla sounds the boatswain's pipe prior to making an announcement over the ship's announcement system aboard the Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Chancellorsville (CG 62). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Andrew Schneider/Released)

 

Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technicians, assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 5 prepare to dive into the Mutsu Bay off the coast of Japan during the 2JA 2016 Mine Countermeasures Exercise (2JA-16 MCMEX). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Alfred A. Coffield/Released)

Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technicians, assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 5 prepare to dive into the Mutsu Bay off the coast of Japan during the 2JA 2016 Mine Countermeasures Exercise (2JA-16 MCMEX). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Alfred A. Coffield/Released)

 

Sailors assigned to Navy Operational Support Center (NOSC) Chattanooga man the rails during a remembrance ceremony for the Fallen Five at Ross's Landing in downtown Chattanooga. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communications Specialist 2nd Class Caine Storino/Released)

Sailors assigned to Navy Operational Support Center (NOSC) Chattanooga man the rails during a remembrance ceremony for the Fallen Five at Ross's Landing in downtown Chattanooga. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communications Specialist 2nd Class Caine Storino/Released)

 

Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson visits USS America (LHA 6), currently operating in the waters near the Hawaiian Islands as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2016. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Nathan Laird/Released)

Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson visits USS America (LHA 6), currently operating in the waters near the Hawaiian Islands as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2016. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Nathan Laird/Released)

 

Rear Adm. John Alexander, Commander, Battle Force 7th Fleet, is soaked with water after being doused with a fire hose in celebration of his final arrested landing aboard the Navy's only forward-deployed aircraft carrier, USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Eduardo Otero/Released)

Rear Adm. John Alexander, Commander, Battle Force 7th Fleet, is soaked with water after being doused with a fire hose in celebration of his final arrested landing aboard the Navy's only forward-deployed aircraft carrier, USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Eduardo Otero/Released)

 

Vice President Joe Biden poses for a photograph with Sailors in the hangar bay aboard USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) during the Rim of the Pacific maritime exercise. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Luke Moyer/Released)

Vice President Joe Biden poses for a photograph with Sailors in the hangar bay aboard USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) during the Rim of the Pacific maritime exercise. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Luke Moyer/Released)

 

Navy Musician 2nd Class Jordan Witt (left), native to Big Stone Gap, Virginia, from the

Navy Musician 2nd Class Jordan Witt (left), native to Big Stone Gap, Virginia, from the "Big Wave" U.S. Pacific Fleet Band, interacts with local children during rehearsal for a concert at Bach Dang Street, part of a Pacific Partnership 2016 community relations event. (Royal Australian Air Force photo by Air Force Imagery Specialist CPL David Cotton/ Released)

 

Logistics Specialist 3rd Class Elizabeth Rios, from Lebanon, Pennsylvania, stands sea and anchor detail watch aboard USS Porter (DDG 78) as the ship arrives in Gaeta, Italy for a scheduled port visit. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Robert S. Price/Released)

Logistics Specialist 3rd Class Elizabeth Rios, from Lebanon, Pennsylvania, stands sea and anchor detail watch aboard USS Porter (DDG 78) as the ship arrives in Gaeta, Italy for a scheduled port visit. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Robert S. Price/Released)

 

 Lt. Stuart Anderson, assigned to the Proud Warriors of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 72, is welcomed home by his son at Naval Air Station Jacksonville. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Timothy Schumaker/Released)

Lt. Stuart Anderson, assigned to the Proud Warriors of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 72, is welcomed home by his son at Naval Air Station Jacksonville. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Timothy Schumaker/Released)

 

Gunner's Mate 1st Class Kyle Galow (center), from St. Matthews, South Carolina, prepares to fire a Mk-38 25mm cannon from a remote control panel on the bridge of the guided-missile cruiser USS Mobile Bay (CG 53) while conducting a live-fire exercise during Rim of the Pacific 2016. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Ryan J. Batchelder/Released)

Gunner's Mate 1st Class Kyle Galow (center), from St. Matthews, South Carolina, prepares to fire a Mk-38 25mm cannon from a remote control panel on the bridge of the guided-missile cruiser USS Mobile Bay (CG 53) while conducting a live-fire exercise during Rim of the Pacific 2016. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Ryan J. Batchelder/Released)

 

Navy musicians from the

Navy musicians from the "Big Wave" U.S. Pacific Fleet Band perform during a concert held at Bach Dang Street, as part of Pacific Partnership 2016 community relations event. (Royal Australian Air Force photo by Air Force Imagery Specialist CPL David Cotton/ Released)

 

Vice President Joe Biden meets with Capt. Greg Huffman, USS John C. Stennis' (CVN 74) commanding officer, on the bridge aboard USS John C. Stennis during the Rim of the Pacific maritime exercise. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Luke Moyer/Released)

Vice President Joe Biden meets with Capt. Greg Huffman, USS John C. Stennis' (CVN 74) commanding officer, on the bridge aboard USS John C. Stennis during the Rim of the Pacific maritime exercise. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Luke Moyer/Released)

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VA named to 2016 “Most Wired” hospitals list [feedly]



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VA named to 2016 "Most Wired" hospitals list
// VAntage Point

The Department of Veterans Affairs, representing all of its health care facilities nationwide, is a 2016 "Most Wired" health care system.  This is the fourth consecutive year VA has been designated for the honor, which distinguishes VA's health care system as a leader in clinical integration and adoption of health Information Technology (HIT) to better care for our Nation's Veterans.

Technology is improving the efficiency of care delivery and creating a new dynamic in patient interactions, according to results of the 18th Annual Health Care's Most Wired® survey, released this month by the American Hospital Association's (AHA) Health Forum.

In redefining the way that they provide care in their communities, Most Wired hospitals such as VA health care facilities use technology to build patient engagement with the Veteran's lifestyle in mind. For the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and its Veteran patients, access to care means electronic access to their care team and the opportunity to use telehealth as an option for care.

Being named a 2016 Most Wired award winner distinguishes VA's health care system as a leader in the implementation and use of Electronic Health Records (EHR), mobile health technology, and social media to better care for our nation's Veterans – three criteria identified as significant in today's health care delivery by Most Wired.

"VA pioneered electronic health records (EHR) and we have not stopped looking for ways to better serve our nation's Veterans, demonstrating our commitment and investment through the use of health technology that improves quality, provides coordinated care, and engages Veterans in their own care management," says Under Secretary for Health, David Shulkin, MD.

VA is a leader in telehealth services, an item new to the Most Wired survey. VA Telehealth services are critical to expanding access to VA care in more than 45 clinical areas.

As the nation's largest health network, VA is constantly looking for ways to serve Veterans in the best, most efficient way possible with the use health IT.  Over the past three years, VA has provided Veteran patients and VA health care teams with even more ways to connect and ensure 21st Century health care through the use of technology – from online sharing health data between VA, DoD, and community health partners to the deployment of a number of VA Apps to better serve patients and providers.

Introducing: The Digital Health Platform in VA

Honoring the lessons of the VA's EHR legacy, VA teams across the country rely on health care providers, staff, and patients to shape the product. Health IT is not a stand-alone product in VA. VA understands that direct input from providers and patients alike will continue to enhance the way we deliver health care. Industry-leading care calls for much more than collaboration on a single EHR. VA is developing a cutting-edge platform that will transform the way it delivers health care to the Veteran.

Picking up where VistA leaves off, VA's new Digital Health Platform (DHP) will enable a modern and integrated health care system that incorporates best-in-class technologies and standards. The use of open-sourced standards and cloud-based technologies bring together the best innovations in a framework to deliver an even more robust health IT platform for the nation's Veterans, while ensuring the best use of public funding.

DHP provides a developer-facing Application Programming Interface (API), unifies VA's data stores, connects patient to provider in real-time, and implements predictive care to provide a better experience to the Veteran.

"VA is committed to implementing cutting-edge technology that adapts and responds to these evolving demographics and market innovations, and DHP does just that," said the Honorable Lavern Council, VA's Chief Information Officer. "Over the next 18 months, we will evaluate costs and assess our options. We look forward to working with our partners at VHA and leveraging industry to develop a comprehensive proof of concept and implementation plan for DHP to take effect at the conclusion of VistA 4."

DHP is part of VA's efforts to align with Secretary McDonald's MyVA Breakthrough Priority of transforming OI&T to improve the Veteran experience, establish a culture of continuous improvement, and enhance strategic partnerships.

"VA is undergoing a historic transformation, guided by Secretary McDonald's MyVA initiative that calls for us to innovate, collaborate, and succeed for the Veteran" said the Honorable Dr. David Shulkin, VHA Under Secretary for Health. "That is why I am thrilled to have the opportunity to work with CIO Council and our team members in OI&T to build the strategic framework for DHP. VA has a history of being a pioneer in the health care IT space, and we stand poised to continue that legacy with VA's new digital health platform."

Detailed results of the survey and study can be found in the July issue of H&HN. For a full list of winners, visit www.hhnmag.com.


Murielle-BeeneAbout the Author: Murielle Been is the Chief Nursing Informatics Officer at VHA.

The post VA named to 2016 "Most Wired" hospitals list appeared first on VAntage Point.


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Lighthouses of Maryland [feedly]



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Lighthouses of Maryland
// Naval History Blog

  Please enjoy a small selection of Maryland Lighthouses from the U.S. Naval Institute Photo Archive. Like those from Virginia, many have guarded the coast since the beginning of our nation. President John Quincy Adams appointed Concord Point Lighthouse's first keeper, John O'Neill, on November 3, 1827. The O'Neill family continued serving in that capacity on and off until the light was automated in 1919, eliminating the need for a keeper. The Coast Guard maintained control until 1975, when the lighthouse was decommissioned. The Friends of Concord Point Lighthouse formed in 1979 to save and restore the historic structure, which... Read the rest of this entry »
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Of ships, stones and graves [feedly]



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Of ships, stones and graves
// Maritime Archaeology «

Viking boat prows, Roskilde, Denmark

Viking boat prows, Roskilde Vikingeskibsmuseet, Denmark

This is part of a series by Curator Dr Stephen Gapps who received an Endeavour Executive Fellowship from April to July 2016. Stephen is based at the Swedish History Museum and the National Maritime Museum (including the Vasa Museum) in Stockholm, Sweden. He is working on several Viking Age and other maritime history and archaeology related projects.

This is the last note in this series of Viking 'journeys'. After nearly three months in Stockholm, it was time to see some of the famous museums, burial sites and stone arrangements across Scandinavia. And some not so famous.

First stop was the island of Birka for a sail on Aifur, the reconstructed Viking Age vessel that travelled by sail, by oars on rivers and overland on wheels from the Baltic to the Caspian Sea in the 1990s. It was one of several important journeys of historical reconstruction that make it beyond doubt the Vikings could have travelled so far to the east.

Aifur at rest

Aifur at Birka, Lake Malaren, just west of Stockholm

Skipper Hkan at left rowing out from Birka Harbour to find some wind

Rowing out from Birka Harbour to find some wind

Aifur's skipper and maritime archaeologist Håkan Altrock's next project is even more ambitious – sail from the Baltic Sea to North America via Iceland and Greenland. He is building a bigger boat – and needs all the help he can get!

Raising the sail. Some wind at last. The Aifur's ability to manoeuvre and sail to windward was quite surprising. The ship's dog Freja My bicycle outside a  Viking Age longhouse - my digs for the night - before I began my 'Biking Viking' tour of Scandinavia

After Birka, it was off by steamboat to the town of Mariefred, also on Lake Malaren. Mariefred is famous for Gripsholm Castle – a Swedish Royal Family residence until the 18th century – but also has a few wonderful runestones.

SS Mariefred, built in 1903 to service the Lake Malaren area west of Stockholm This stone was set by Tolla in memory of her sons Ingvar the Far-travelled and Harald, who both died while voyaging 'in the south, in Serkland', the the Saracens' lands. Birka staff at Mid-summer festivities A most excellent traffic roundabout in the form of a Viking shield

Then it was time to pop the bicycle on a train and leave Sweden to visit the Viking Ship Museum in Oslo, Norway. The museum was purpose built in the 1930s to house archaeological finds from the ship burial sites Tune, Gokstad and Oseberg and the Borre mound cemetery. The Oseberg ship was placed in a burial mound around 834 AD, though the ship is thought to be older than this. It was excavated in 1904 and was found to contain the remains of two women. It was well preserved and filled with grave goods. Some textiles and even the women's dresses have survived. The ship itself is truly spectacular and one of the finest finds to have survived from the Viking Age.

The graceful lines of the Oseberg are highlighted in the purpose built museum galleries Oseberg Detail of the Oseberg's decorative prow Decoration from a cart found on the ship burial

Next stop was the Viking Ship Museum at Roskilde in Denmark. Here, the main focus of the museum is five Viking Age vessels that were sunk to block the Skuldelev Harbour from sea-borne attack around the year 1070 AD, just at the end of the Viking Age. A thousand years later in 1962 they were found, quite intact, by archaeologists. The vessels give a wonderful overview of the range of Viking Age craft from cargo ships to ships of war.

Roskilde museum There are several reconstructed vessels at the museum wharves A small Viking Age vessel being built at the museum

After leaving Roskilde I continued on through southern Sweden, riding along the Skåne region coastline. Next stop was the reconstructed Viking Age settlement at Foteviken, followed by the Trelleborg ring fortress.

Rune stones at Foteviken Foteviken presents a recreation of a late Viking Age/Early Medieval township The recreated township is popular with historical reenactors and the site of a Viking Age market annually in July. Reconstructed Trelleborgen Viking Age ring fortress walls at Trelleborg in southern Sweden.

The next major stop on my 'biking Viking' tour was Ales stenar, or Ale's Stones – Sweden's largest stone arrangement in the outline of a ship. It was probably erected around 1,400 years ago, towards the end of the Nordic Iron Age.

Ale's stones consist of 59 boulders of up to 1.8 tonnes each At each end of the ship form of Ale's Stones are two larger stones There are several theories as to the function of Ale's Stones Another standing stone arrangement known as Disa's Ting seems to have been an earlier Bronze Age site used in the Viking Age as a Ting or law-making site.

Three months working at the Swedish History Museum, National Maritime Museum and Vasa Museum had come to a close. You may have noticed a bit of a theme in my 'Journeys' blog posts – from Ghost Ships to Zombie Vikings to rune stones, stone ship settings and ship burials. Over the next few months I will be exploring cross-cultural comparisons of ship symbolism in funeral practices, as well as the idea of the ocean as a grave site. Watch this space..

flying ship

Many churches in Scandinavia have commemorative ships – reminding me how maritime history permeates terrestrial landscapes as well as marine.

Dr Stephen Gapps, ANMM Curator

 

 

 

 

 

 


Filed under: Journeys Tagged: Aifur, Ale's Stones, Birka, Disa's Ting, Foteviken, Historiska Museet, ship burials, ship stone settings, stone settings, Trelleborg, Vasa Museum, viking age, viking ship museum oslo, viking ship museum roskilde, Vikings
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