Wednesday, September 14, 2016

‘Nurse’ in Iconic WWII Kiss Photo Dies



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'Nurse' in Iconic WWII Kiss Photo Dies
// Naval History Blog

Greta Zimmer Friedman, the woman in one of history's most memorable photographs, passed away on 8 September at age 92 after suffering a number of ailments, according to her family. On 14 August 1945, she was a dental assistant who had wandered into Time Square when news broke of the Japanese surrender. Famed photographer Alfred Eisenstaedt's photo of Zimmer being kissed by a stranger, Petty Officer First Class George Mendonsa, indelibly captured the celebratory mood in New York City and throughout the country. Many have claimed to be the sailor and the "nurse" in the photograph, but the most thorough study of the impromptu embrace–Lawrence Verria... Read the rest of this entry »
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‘Nurse’ in Iconic WWII Kiss Photo Dies



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'Nurse' in Iconic WWII Kiss Photo Dies
// Naval History Blog

Greta Zimmer Friedman, the woman in one of history's most memorable photographs, passed away on 8 September at age 92 after suffering a number of ailments, according to her family. On 14 August 1945, she was a dental assistant who had wandered into Time Square when news broke of the Japanese surrender. Famed photographer Alfred Eisenstaedt's photo of Zimmer being kissed by a stranger, Petty Officer First Class George Mendonsa, indelibly captured the celebratory mood in New York City and throughout the country. Many have claimed to be the sailor and the "nurse" in the photograph, but the most thorough study of the impromptu embrace–Lawrence Verria... Read the rest of this entry »
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The Wartime Films Project: Remembering WWI



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The Wartime Films Project: Remembering WWI
// NARAtions

This post comes from Kerri Young at Historypin, our partners in the Wartime Films engagement project, and is part of a series outlining how NARA is using design thinking to reach new and existing audiences.

In this last installment of our series on user-centered design and the national WWI App, now titled Remembering WWI, we look at our initial public launch, workshops with cultural heritage partners, and the process of continued feedback and iteration.

Together with our content partners the Library of Congress and the Smithsonian National Museum of American History, we made our first major public announcement at the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) Fest in April. As part of this gathering, we held a number of user workshops to continue fine tuning the user experience of the app's first public iteration, which will debut in beta this fall. We also gave two presentations on the collaborative process of building Remembering WWI: "Smithsonian, Library of Congress, and National Archives: Opportunities and Challenges for Working Together", and "Historypin and the National Archives: APIs, Apps, and Audiences."

Working closely with our national content partners, and with thematic guidance from the National WWI Museum and Memorial, we started to identify WWI content that each could feature from their own collections. This was an opportunity to focus on the diversity of narratives and paint a more complete picture of the American experience during WWI. Looking for geo-locatable content played a role in this as well, as we wanted to make sure that we could surface content from a wide variety of regions. Since many institutions do not prioritize location as part of their metadata, this also gave us an opportunity to note some partner content that could potentially benefit from crowdsourced user input once the app is live.

Jon Voss from Historypin moderating a panel focusing on institutional partnerships for the app project at DPLA Fest

Jon Voss from Historypin moderating a panel focusing on institutional partnerships for the app project at DPLA Fest

Throughout development, we've never stopped seeking and building upon feedback from our target audiences. In June, we held a workshop in Kansas City in which teachers had a hands-on opportunity to review updated designs. For this intimate workshop, educators from across the country gathered at the National WWI Museum and Memorial to help test the app and explore realistic scenarios for how it could be used in a classroom setting. Workshops like the one in Kansas City play an important role in helping us maintain relationships with key external representatives who will follow our progress and feed it as we iterate.

Having fun walking through potential app scenarios at the Kansas City teacher workshop. Photo credit: Kimberlee Reid

Having fun walking through potential app scenarios at the Kansas City teacher workshop. Photo credit: Kimberlee Reid

Moving forward, Remembering WWI will allow users to undertake deep exploration of NARA WWI content and create their own collections. We are seeding as much content as possible through the location-based Historypin platform, where we are also working to create themed collections based on WWI subjects recommended during the Kansas City workshop. These collections will provide jumping-off points for content discovery, and can serve as inspiration for app users. As the resources and community within Remembering WWI continue to grow, we plan to work with our user-design partners to introduce additional features such as helpful resource text for both teachers and curators.

The Historypin collection where we are currently seeding content for the app, at historypin.org/en/rememberingww1

The Historypin collection where we are currently seeding content for the app, at http://www.historypin.org/en/rememberingww1

As we reach the end of the initial development stage and prepare to share the product of this work with the public, we look forward to hearing your reactions. How will you use the app as a teacher or as a cultural institution?  What are you hoping to learn, and how can we help to enrich the experience? This is just the first step in our collaborative goal of Remembering WWI  and we hope you'll join us.


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World War I: Conscription Laws



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World War I: Conscription Laws
// Library of Congress Blog

(The following is a guest post by Margaret Wood, a legal reference librarian at the Law Library of Congress.)

1s04183r

Six weeks after the declaration of war against Germany on April 6, 1917, ch. 1, 40 Stat.1, Congress passed the Selective Service Act. Initially, President Woodrow Wilson and Congress had hoped the needed 1 million men would volunteer for the army. But when by May only about 73,000 men had signed up, it was clear other measures needed to be taken.

The United States had experimented with conscription laws during the Civil War. The Confederacy had passed the first such law (S.32) on April 16, 1862. The Union followed by passing a conscription law on March 3, 1863, ch. 75, 12 Stat. 731. Both Union and Confederate subscription laws allowed for a number of exemptions as well as including the very unpopular measure of "substitutes," which allowed wealthy men to pay for someone to serve in their stead.

However, the World War I Selective Service Act, ch. 15, 40 Stat. 76, specifically forbade the use of substitutes. This law, which was passed on May 18, 1917, applied to all "male citizens, or male persons … who have declared their intention to become citizens, between the ages of twenty–one and thirty." The law directed that quotas for each state should be established based on the state's population. The law also addressed the issue of exemptions based on moral objections, as well as occupation. Those exempted from the draft included federal and state officials and judges, religious ministers, seminary students and any person who was found to be a "member of a well-recognized religious sect or organization … whose existing creed or principles forbid its members to participate in war in any form." However as the law went on to state, "no person so exempted shall be exempted from service in any capacity that the President shall declare to be noncombatant." The law also exempted persons in certain classes or industries, including workmen in armories and those in agriculture whose work was "necessary to the maintenance of the Military Establishment."

Ultimately the regulations issued by the president divided up the men subject to conscription into five classes. This law directed the president to create local draft boards in each county that were to consist of three or more members who were to determine all questions of exemption in their jurisdiction. The law further set up district boards that could hear appeals from the county draft boards.

Between Aug. 6-19, 1918, the House Committee on Military Affairs held hearings to consider expanding the ages between which men should be drafted.  Secretary of War Newton D. Baker testified at the hearing that, "There are two ways of fighting this war. One is to make every possible effort and win it soon, and the other is to proceed in a somewhat more leisurely fashion and win it late." Congress appears to have preferred the first method, and a little less that two weeks later amended the Selective Service Act (ch. 166, 40 Stat. 955). This law made all men between the ages of 18 and 45 subject to the draft. The penalties for evading the draft remained the same. The evader would be charged with a misdemeanor and subject to a year of imprisonment unless the evader was subject to military law, in which case they would be tried by a court-martial. Congress anticipated a shortage of "manpower" and directed that soldiers' wives should not be disqualified from working for the government because they were married women.  Indeed, 10 years after the war, Congress held hearings about the effect of the universal draft and conscription in times of war.

World War I Centennial, 2017-2018: With the most comprehensive collection of multi-format World War I holdings in the nation, the Library of Congress is a unique resource for primary source materials, education plans, public programs and on-site visitor experiences about The Great War including exhibits, symposia and book talks.


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Merchant Marine Cadets Help Navy Knock The Rust Off Sextants



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Merchant Marine Cadets Help Navy Knock The Rust Off Sextants
// gCaptain.com

160903-N-PD309-516 PHILIPPINE SEA (Sept. 3, 2016) Midshipmen 2nd Class Benjamin Sams and Reagan Stromback, students at the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy, fix the ship's position using a sextant aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Benfold (DDG 65). Benfold is on patrol with Carrier Strike Group 5 in the Philippine Sea supporting security and stability in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Deven Leigh Ellis/Released)By Commander Justin Harts, USN (USS Benfold) According to the definitive book on marine navigation familiar to most naval officers – "The American Practical Navigator" – navigation began the first time humans had to find their way home using some object that caught their eye. Marine navigation was born shortly afterwards when humans observed that […]

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WATCH: USS Jackson Survives 10,000-Pound Explosive Shock Test (But it was Close)



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WATCH: USS Jackson Survives 10,000-Pound Explosive Shock Test (But it was Close)
// gCaptain.com

160613-N-DN943-001  ATLANTIC OCEAN (June 10, 2016) The littoral combat ship USS Jackson (LCS 6) successfully completes the first of three scheduled full-ship shock trials June 10, 2016. The shock trials are designed to demonstrate the ship's ability to withstand the effects of nearby underwater explosion and retain required capability. Jackson is currently ported at Naval Station Mayport, Fla., for required inspections and preparation for the second full-ship shock trial scheduled for later this month. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Michael Bevan/Released)The U.S. Navy has released some amazing footage showing a recent shock trial on the littoral combat ship USS Jackson off the Florida coast. The Full Ship Shock Trials (FSST) began in June and involved three tests conducted using a 10,000-pound explosive charge during each. One of the blasts was actually so strong that there […]

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Tuesday, September 13, 2016

Pershing & Patton Diaries Online | News Releases - Library of Congress

Diaries of John J. Pershing and George S. Patton Now Online

The Library of Congress has recently placed online the diaries, notebooks and address books of John J. Pershing, commander-in-chief of the American Expeditionary Forces in World War I, and the diaries of George S. Patton, a tank commander in World War I and a U.S. Army general in World War II.

These items join thousands of original materials from the World War I era that the Library of Congress has digitized and made accessible for use, ahead of the centennial of America's entry into the Great War in April 2017. 

Pershing's digitized diaries, notebooks and address books describe his command of the American Expeditionary Forces in France during World War I and his postwar service as army chief of staff until 1925. Patton's diaries, 1910-1945, illustrate his activities during the Mexican Punitive Expedition, World War I and World War II.

The online materials of both men are part of larger collections held by the Library of Congress that are available for research and can be viewed on-site in the Library's Manuscript Division Reading Room.

The entire collection of Pershing papers spans the years 1882-1971, with the bulk of the material concentrated in the period 1904-1948. It consists of correspondence, diaries, notebooks, speeches, statements, writings, orders, maps, scrapbooks, newspaper clippings, picture albums, posters, photographs, printed matter and memorabilia.

The entire collection of Patton's papers spans the years 1807-1979, with the bulk of the papers concentrated from 1904-1945. The collection documents Patton's military career, including his attendance at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, 1904-1909; his service on the Mexican border as a member of John J. Pershing's Mexican Punitive Expedition, 1916-1917; his service as an aide-de-camp to Pershing and later as a tank commander in World War I, 1917-1919; and his military career from 1938-1945. The majority of the papers chronicle Patton's World War II service.

Other World War I-era original-source materials that the Library has digitized include posters; sheet music; military battles and campaign maps; and newspapers, including The Stars and Stripes. These items can be searched for and viewed on the Library's website at loc.gov.

On April 4, 2017, the Library of Congress will open a major exhibition, "Echoes of the Great War: American Experiences of World War I," to commemorate the centennial of the United States' entry into the Great War. The exhibition will examine the upheaval of world war, as Americans experienced it—domestically and overseas. It will close in January 2019. Initially, the exhibition will feature 200 items, but during its 18-month run, numerous other artifacts will be rotated into the display. 

An exhibition showing how American artists galvanized public interest in World War I is currently on display at the Library of Congress. "World War I: American Artists View the Great War" is on view through Aug. 19, 2017 in the Graphic Arts Galleries on the ground floor of the Library's Thomas Jefferson Building, 10 First St. S.E., Washington, D.C. The exhibition is free and open to the public Monday through Saturday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. An online version can be viewed at loc.gov/exhibits/american-artists-view-the-great-war/.

With the most comprehensive collection of multi-format World War I holdings in the nation, the Library is a unique resource for primary-source materials, education plans, public programs and on-site visitor experiences about The Great War, including exhibits, symposia and book talks. 

The Library of Congress is the world's largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States—and extensive materials from around the world—both on site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov, access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov, and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.


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Monday, September 12, 2016

ARLINGTON, Va. (Sept. 11, 2016)

Sunrise at the Pentagon prior to a ceremony to commemorate the 15th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001 terror attacks.
ARLINGTON, Va. (Sept. 11, 2016) Sunrise at the Pentagon prior to a ceremony to commemorate the 15th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001 terror attacks. The American flag is draped over the site of impact at the Pentagon. In 2008, the National 9/11 Pentagon Memorial opened adjacent to the site, located on Boundary Channel Drive in Arlington, Va., and commemorates the 184 lives lost at the Pentagon and onboard American Airlines Flight 77 during the terrorist attacks. (U.S. Navy photo by Damon J. Moritz/Released)

NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (Sept. 9, 2016)

Service members, emergency services units and local citizens take part in a memorial ceremony at Victory Arch in Newport News to honor those lost during the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks
Service members, emergency services units and local citizens take part in a memorial ceremony at Victory Arch in Newport News to honor those lost during the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. Sailors from Pre-Commissioning Unit Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78), USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72), USS Enterprise (CVN 65), and Joint Base Langley-Eustis joined McKinley L. Price, mayor of Newport News, Virginia, and members of the Virginia Port Authority and Newport News Fire and Police Departments for the memorial ceremony. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Jonathan Pankau (Released) 160909-N-CV877-146

Maritime Monday for September 12th, 2016



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Maritime Monday for September 12th, 2016
// gCaptain.com

carolinaInspired by Mariners on 9/11, One Photographer Found a Passion Sunday marks 15 years since the September 11th terrorist attacks that killed nearly 3,000 people in New York, Washington and Shanksville, Penn. Over the next few days, WNYC is speaking with a few individuals whose lives were altered by the events of that day. After […]

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VIDEO: New View of Carnival Vista Prop Wash Destroying Italian Marina



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VIDEO: New View of Carnival Vista Prop Wash Destroying Italian Marina
// gCaptain.com

carnival-vistaA new video filmed from by a passenger aboard the Carnival Vista provides a new view of the moment the giant cruise ship destroyed a marina as it departed Messina, Italy in August. As you can see from this view it looks like wind may have played a factor, pushing the cruise ship to within just […]

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Video: Packed Tour Boat Slams Into River Thames Pier in Downtown London



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Video: Packed Tour Boat Slams Into River Thames Pier in Downtown London
// gCaptain.com

Credit: Dane Hines/TwitterAn out of control tour boat filled with passengers slammed into a pier on the River Thames Sunday afternoon after fire broke out in the engine room of the vessel. A video of the incident posted to social media shows the ship plow into the embankment as smoked poured from the stern. The incident occurred […]

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Two Crew Killed as Viking River Cruise Ship Wheelhouse Hits Low Bridge in Germany [Incident Photos]



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Two Crew Killed as Viking River Cruise Ship Wheelhouse Hits Low Bridge in Germany [Incident Photos]
// gCaptain.com

Cruise ship called 'Viking Freya' is seen after a collision with a bridge at Main-Donau-Kanal in Erlangen, Germany, September 11, 2016. REUTERS/Michaela RehleTwo officers navigating the Viking River Cruises cruise ship Viking Freya were killed overnight when the vessel struck a bridge on Main-Donau-Kanal in Erlangen, Germany. The incident reportedly occurred at about 1:30 a.m. The Viking Freya has a retractable wheelhouse that can be lowered when the vessel passes below low bridges (see in the video […]

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Why is North Korea testing nuclear weapons?



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Why is North Korea testing nuclear weapons?
// BBC News - Home

North Korea has carried out another nuclear test. It is the country's fifth and sparked global indignation. Why is it important?
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Hillary Clinton 'stumbles' at 9/11 event



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Hillary Clinton 'stumbles' at 9/11 event
// BBC News - Home

US Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton says she is "feeling great" after apparently stumbling while leaving a 9/11 ceremony early.
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War in the Altipiani: Part II – The Strafexpedition of 1916



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War in the Altipiani: Part II – The Strafexpedition of 1916
// Roads to the Great War

Italian Prisoners Taken in the 1916 Austro-Hungarian Offensive In May 1916 on the first anniversary of the war in Italy, the largest battle on the Italian front outside of the Isonzo region was launched from the Austrian fortresses. Called the Battle of Asiago in English-language sources, it was known to the participants as the Strafexpedition — Austria's Chief of Staff Conrad von
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Anthony Fokker - Japanese Army - Semi-Auto Rifles I OUT OF THE TRENCHES



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Hillary Clinton's pneumonia shows running for president is a hazardous job [feedly]



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Hillary Clinton's pneumonia shows running for president is a hazardous job
// The Guardian World News

A diagnosis of a recoverable illness made dramatic news but previous aspirants to the highest office have suffered from heart attacks, cancer, typhoid and more

Campaigns, the White House and the public make gruelling demands on leaders: amid persistent questions about candidates' health, symptoms have included pneumonia on the trail, migraines during debates and even vomit in the lap of a prime minister.

Related: Hillary Clinton has pneumonia, says doctor, after exit from 9/11 ceremony

Continue reading...
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First Offshore Exhibition at Maritime Museum Rotterdam



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First Offshore Exhibition at Maritime Museum Rotterdam
// Maritime News - Maritime & Shipbuilding News

Over forty-five leading companies in the shipping and offshore maritime sector are among those who have contributed to the funding for the first ever exhibition
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China’s High Seas Ambitions



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China's High Seas Ambitions
// NOSI - Naval Open Source Intelligence™

Der Spiegel – With its Maritime Silk Road, China is tapping the world's oceans for its own strategic purposes. It's a bold plan that is causing unease in India and the United States — and also has implications for Europe.


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Judicial Proceedings Panel to consider victim’s appellate rights



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Judicial Proceedings Panel to consider victim's appellate rights
// CAAFlog

The next meeting of the Judicial Proceedings Panel will occur on Friday, September 23, 2016, in Arlington, VA. A full announcement of the meeting is available here.

The agenda for this meeting is primarily presentations from former appellate judges in the military justice system (including former Chief Judge Baker of CAAF), and from the military appellate organizations (Government and defense), all providing "perspectives on victims' appellate rights."

Since the establishment of Article 6b, enacted in the wake of CAAF's narrow decision in LRM v. Kastenberg, 72 M.J. 364 (C.A.A.F. 2013) (CAAFlog case page), we've had a few occasions to wonder about the scope of an alleged victim's ability to intrude upon the automatic appellate review of a court-martial conviction. This term, for instance, CAAF determined that it lacks jurisdiction to entertain a writ-appeal under Article 6b, in EV v. United States & Martinez, 75 M.J. 331 (C.A.A.F. Jun. 21, 2016) (CAAFlog case page). CAAF also declined to intervene to prevent the disclosure of sealed materials (mental health records of alleged victims that were attached to the record of trial) to appellate defense counsel in a handful of Air Force cases (discussed here and here).

Alleged victims are not parties to a court-martial, they're (at most) witnesses. While Article 6b(e) gives an alleged victim (or their representative) certain extra rights, and allows such a person to seek enforcement of those rights by a writ of mandamus from a court of criminal appeals, there is no clear basis to treat alleged victims differently from any other witness during appellate review of a court-martial. Perhaps, however, the JPP will find one.


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Sunday, September 11, 2016

Russian Nuclear Storage Map : Nuclear Missile Silo Locations, Russian Northern Fleet Bases Map, How Many Does The Us Have Nuclear Weapons, Us Military Nuclear Weapons, Download The Nabucco Pipeline Map By Osservatorio Balcani E Caucaso Images

http://sukirgenk.dvrlists.com/russian-nuclear-storage-map.html
Nuke Silo

Navy Surveys the North Sea for Links to the Toughness of its Past



Navy Surveys the North Sea for Links to the Toughness of its Past


Surveys the North Sea
SEPTEMBER 9, 2016, NORTH SEA (NNS) – A multinational group of Sailors and scientists from a variety commands, organizations and militaries surveys the North Sea for the wreckage of Revolutionary War ship Bonhomme Richard, Sept. 2-9.


Underwater archaeologists from the Naval History and Heritage Command (NHHC), Navy divers from Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit(MDSU) 2, Sailors from Naval Oceanography Mine Warfare Center (NOMWC), Sailors from the French Mine Clearance Dive Unit (MCDU) and members from Global Foundation for Ocean Exploration (GFOE) embarked upon Military Sealift Command rescue and salvage ship USNS Grasp (T-ARS 51) to survey a late 18th or early 19th century-shipwreck off the coast of England in the North Sea.
The site is interesting to researchers for many reasons, not least of which is its location in the same general area as that of the final battle of John Paul Jones’ famous warship Bonhomme Richard. While some evidence from the site suggests the wreck could be contemporaneous to Jones’s ship, other information suggests it sank much later.
“The site has potential to be from the late 18th to early 19th century,” said George Schwarz, Ph.D., an underwater archaeologist from NHHC. “Although the site has some intriguing features, including buried wooden hull, well-preserved organic artifacts and large concentrations of concreted iron objects, we also have later material on site such as sections of 19th century iron chain.”
NHHC, NOMWC and MCDU all surveyed different areas around the shipwreck site using various pieces of equipment. NHHC used a magnetometer towed behind a rigid hull inflatable boat (RHIB) to map possible concentrations of iron along a predetermined grid over the site. NOMWC used unmanned underwater vehicles to survey other areas of the site and MCDU used a towed side scan sonar. MDSU 2 accompanied the mission and provided logistical and small boat support.
“The teams worked well together to collect seafloor and sub-seafloor features in and around the wreck,” said Schwarz. “These new data sets will aid considerably in the interpretation of the site and we’re looking forward to future collaboration with project partners.”
Both NHHC and NOMWC often had to trade off using the RHI but MCDU had their own and surveyed the site whenever weather and sea conditions allowed. The many hours they spent out on the water allowed them time to reflect on their mission and their part in it.
Acknowledging Bonhomme Richard was given to Jones and the U.S. Navy by France, one of the participating French scuba divers explained he’s glad to be a part of the survey mission and that he is happy to be a part of it.
The identity of the shipwreck under investigation is currently unknown but future surveys of the site may be planned pending interpretation results of data gathered during this mission. In addition to the wreck site surveyed, the teams conducted remote-sensing operations over an additional two square nautical miles, expanding the previously surveyed areas.
During the Revolutionary War, the French crown loaned Bonhomme Richard to the United States. Commanded by John Paul Jones, Bonhomme Richard’s crew was an early example of Sailor toughness. The ship and her squadron were ordered to the United Kingdom to cruise for prizes off the coasts of Ireland, Scotland and England. About a month into her mission Sept. 23, 1779, she encountered a convoy of merchant ships underway from Flamborough Head, which immediately turned back once they caught sight of Jones and his ships. Jones pursued and around 6:30 p.m. engaged HMS Serapis, which had been covering the retreat. Three and a half hours later, Bonhomme Richard emerged victorious-but mortally wounded. Jones shifted his colors to Serapis, the wounded were transferred over and her riggings were repaired. Bonhomme Richard sank somewhere in the North Sea. Her logs were not updated in her final hours and so her final location remains unknown.
NHHC, located at the Washington Navy Yard, is responsible for the preservation, analysis and dissemination of U.S. naval history and heritage. It provides the knowledge foundation for the Navy by maintaining historically relevant resources and products that reflect the Navy’s unique and enduring contributions through our nation’s history, and supports the fleet by assisting with and delivering professional research, analysis and interpretive services. NHHC is composed of many activities including the Navy Department Library, the Navy Operational Archives, the Navy art and artifact collections, underwater archeology, Navy histories, ten museums, USS Constitution repair facility and the historic ship Nautilus.

In One Ear: Discovering Endeavour


For maritime history buffs: Back to the subject of British navigator/explorer Capt. James Cook (pictured inset) … did you know a story on CNN.com says that in May they found the wreckage of the actual HMS Endeavour — often considered one of the most famous ships in nautical history — in Newport Harbor, off the coast of Rhode Island (http://tinyurl.com/cookboat)?
For those whose naval history is a little shaky, Cook, while commander of the Endeavour (1768-1771), made the first landing on the east coast of Australia. He circumnavigated New Zealand to boot, and was also famous for his accurate maps of the Pacific Ocean.
After all of her adventures with Cook, the Endeavour was bought by a private owner, renamed the Lord Sandwich, and wound up taking part in the American Revolutionary War, albeit in not the way one would expect. The ship, along with 12 others, was scuttled by the British in shallow water in Newport Harbor to create a blockade during the 1778 Battle of Rhode Island.
Although the ships have been known to be there for some time, it was only recently that the Rhode Island Marine Archeology Project managed to positively identify the Endeavor/Sandwich. A more detailed exploration of the wreck is planned.
— Elleda Wilson

U.S. Navy Moves to Simplify Littoral Ship Operations Amid Flaws

By Bloomberg on Sep 09, 2016 07:14 am
150428-N-TC437-320
PACIFIC OCEAN (April 28, 2015) The littoral combat ship USS Freedom (LCS 1) transits alongside the aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) in preparation for a replenishment-at-sea training exercise. U.S. Navy ships are underway conducting an independent deployer certification exercise off the coast of Southern California. The exercise provides a multi-ship environment to train and certify independent deployers in surface warfare, air defense, maritime-interception operations, command and control/information warfare, command, control, computers and combat systems intelligence and mine warfare. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Ignacio D. Perez/Released)By Tony Capaccio (Bloomberg) — Confronted with equipment breakdowns and harried crews, the U.S. Navy is moving to simply and stabilize operations of its troubled Littoral Combat Ship. In its effort to revamp the $29 billion program, the service will use the first four ships for more extensive testing, reduce the rotation of crew members […]
 
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