Saturday, October 8, 2016

Soviet nuclear submarine carrying nuclear weapons sank north of Bermuda in 1986


K-219 map

Position of tug Powhaten is shown to the southwest of last K-219 position. (U.S. Navy Photo) 

 

 

 

Washington D.C., October 7, 2016 -Thirty years ago, a Soviet nuclear submarine with about 30 nuclear warheads on board sank off U.S. shores north of Bermuda as Mikhail Gorbachev and Ronald Reagan were preparing for their historic summit in Reykjavik, Iceland.  But instead of Chernobyl-style denials, the Soviet government reached out to the Americans, issued a public statement, and even received offers of help from Washington, according to the never-before-published transcript of that day’s Politburo session, posted today by the National Security Archive.

The submarine, designated K-219, suffered an explosion in one of its missile tubes due to the leakage of missile fuel into the tube on October 3.  The 667-A project Yankee-class boat was armed with 16 torpedoes and 16 ballistic missiles. After the initial explosion, the crew members heroically put out fire and were forced to shut down the nuclear reactors manually because the command-and-control equipment had been damaged.  Three crew members died in the blast and fire. Senior Seaman Sergey Preminin stayed in the reactor compartment to shut down reactors, and could not be evacuated.  The rest escaped safely.

Initially, it seemed the submarine could be salvaged; it was attached to the Soviet commercial ship Krasnogvardeisk for towing.  However, the tow cord broke for unknown reasons and the submarine sank.  Submarine Commander Captain Second rank Igor Britanov stayed with the sub until its final moments.  He initially came under investigation at home but all charges were removed in 1987.  According to statements by U.S. Vice Admiral Powell Carter, the submarine did not present a danger of nuclear explosion or radioactive contamination, as was reported by the New York Times.[1]

The Politburo discussion, published in English for the first time, shows how the Soviet leadership learned the lessons of Chernobyl.  The U.S. side was immediately informed about the accident on October 3. The fight for the survival of the submarine lasted three days. Gorbachev notes to his colleagues that Reagan thanked the Soviets for providing information quickly and in a transparent manner.  He suggests that “it would be expedient to act in the same manner as we did the last time, i.e. to send information to the Americans, the IAEA, and TASS.” Gromyko emphasizes the need to inform Soviet citizens as well, by issuing a statement from TASS. 

The Politburo also heard a report from Deputy Defense Minister Chief of Navy Admiral Vladimir Chernavin.  Other members present express concerns about a possible U.S. effort to salvage parts of the submarine and gain access to design information.  But Chernavin assures them that the boat design is outdated and therefore is not of any interest to the Americans.  Another major concern raised is the possibility of a nuclear explosion or radioactive contamination due to water pressure at extreme depths.  Chernavin cites Soviet Navy commission experts who ruled out the possibility of a nuclear detonation and concluded that contamination would happen over a long period and would not reach the surface.

This was the first time the Soviets had ever delivered a public information report immediately after an accident of this type and did not view U.S. actions in the area as a provocation. Communications between the two superpowers were therefore very constructive.  Having learned how damaging to the Soviet image the secrecy surrounding the Chernobyl accident was, Gorbachev decided to truly deploy glasnostin this case.  In addition to the shadow of Chernobyl, the conduct of both sides, along with the tone of the Politburo discussion, were clearly influenced by preparations for the upcoming summit, which both leaders considered a top priority.   

 


[1] Bernard Gwertzman, “Soviet Atomic Sub Sinks in Atlantic 3 Days After Fire,” The New York Times, October 7, 1986.

 

READ THE DOCUMENT

6 October 1986 SESSION OF THE POLITBURO OF THE CC CPSU: "About the loss of nuclear submarine of the USSR Navy."

Russian originalEnglish translation

 



 

New CIA Access Rule Bears Watching, and More: FRINFORMSUM 10/6/2016



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New CIA Access Rule Bears Watching, and More: FRINFORMSUM 10/6/2016
// UNREDACTED

The CIA has changed its rules for access to classified historical CIA records three times since 2011. Two changes, from September 2011 and August 2016, concern 32 CFR Part 1909's rules governing access by Historical Researchers and Certain Former Government Personnel – researches like Evan Thomas, author of The Very Best Men. The differences include […]
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Death on the Historic Ketch Amicitia Caused by Bad Mast Repair?



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Death on the Historic Ketch Amicitia Caused by Bad Mast Repair?
// Old Salt Blog - a virtual port of call for all those who love the sea

amicitiaGermany's Federal Bureau of Maritime Casualty Investigation has released a preliminary report suggesting that a mast repair on the ketch Amicita may have been the cause of a fatal accident in which three male passengers were struck and killed by falling rigging on August 21th.

The ketch Amicita was built in 1889 and worked as a sailing cargo carrier. In the 90s, she was converted for passenger service. A German family of twelve had chartered the ketch with the captain and his wife, for a family vacation on the Wadden sea.  On a Sunday in the early afternoon, on the last day of their vacation, the main mast broke. The falling mast and rigging killed three men aged 19, 43 and 48.

At the time, press reports described the tragedy as a "freak accident."  The preliminary investigation now suggests that it may have been caused by a faulty repair to the main mast.

As reported by Maritime Executive: "Underneath a stainless steel wear sleeve screwed to the mast, they found repairs executed by placement of wooden wedges into mast sections which were previously rotten or worn. Water could gather under the stainless sleeve, entering into the wood at the point of the repair and leading to rot. 

Investigators found moisture penetrating all the way to the core of the mast at the point of the break, and they estimated that only about 25 percent of the mast's wood was still present for strength. 

The German authorities noted that their results are preliminary while a Dutch investigation continues. However, they warned German operators that the same type of incident could happen on any similarly equipped vessel with wooden masts, and urged them to carefully inspect their rigging and repair work – especially on working passenger vessels."

The post Death on the Historic Ketch Amicitia Caused by Bad Mast Repair? appeared first on Old Salt Blog.


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SURVEY: Who is your favorite character from naval fiction?

 

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SURVEY: Who is your favorite character from naval fiction?
// Naval History Blog

Horatio Hornblower, Ahab, Jack Ryan, Jack Sparrow—in books, movies, or television, some of the most colorful characters in fiction have sailed the high seas. The Naval Institute Press is curious…who is YOUR favorite character from naval fiction? Participate in this fun survey. Results will be gathered until 12 October. Once the results have been tabulated, we'll share our findings!
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Mapping the Imaginary



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Mapping the Imaginary
// Library of Congress Blog

(The following is an article written by Hannah Stahl and featured in the September/October 2016 issue of the Library of Congress Magazine, LCM. Stahl is a library technician in the Library's Geography and Map Division. This article is adapted from a series of posts by the author on the Geography and Map Division's blog.)

Maps of fictional places in life and literature help fuel our imaginations.

1973 facsimile by Daniel Devereaux of

1973 facsimile by Daniel Devereaux of "Royaume d'Amour" (Kingdom of Love), created by Tristan l'Hermite and Jean Sadeler in 1650. Geography and Map Division.

Among the road maps, topographic maps and country maps in the Library's Geography and Map Division are maps of intangible places that will set the hearts of ction and fantasy lovers aflutter.

The practice of mapping imaginary worlds started as early as the Middle Ages and continued to be popular during the Renaissance. Readers of Dante's "Inferno," written in the 14th century, have mapped the nine circles of Hell through which Dante traveled. Another 14th-century work, Chaucer's "Canterbury Tales," has inspired maps showing the pilgrimage from London to Canterbury.

Some of the most famous maps of imaginary places created during the Renaissance also depict imaginary journeys. One such map is the "Royaume d'Amour/Kingdom of Love," created by Tristan l'Hermite and Jean Sadeler, and published in 1650. This map, which shows the journey of love, depicts the real island of Kythira (Cythera) in Greece. The mythical Aphrodite, goddess of love, was said to have lived there, making the island a perfect place for the Royaume d'Amour. It includes fictional place names such as "Grande Plaine d'Indifference" (the Great Plain of Indifference)—places that lovers who travel in the Royaume d'Amour would eventually reach on their journey.

Many fictional stories take place in the real world, as in Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice" (1813), which inspired one reader to create " " to show important places in her novels. Similarly, readers have depicted Huckleberry Finn's journey down the Mississippi River as told by Mark Twain.

Based on the novel by Mark Twain, this pictorial map by Everett Henry shows Huckleberry Finn's adventures on the Mississippi River. Cleveland, Ohio: Harris-Intertype Corp., 1959. Geography and Map Division

Based on the novel by Mark Twain, this
pictorial map by Everett Henry shows Huckleberry Finn's adventures on the Mississippi River. Cleveland, Ohio: Harris-Intertype Corp., 1959. Geography and Map Division

Authors who include maps of imaginary worlds in their works help their readers disappear from their comfy armchairs by the fire into fictional worlds, perhaps with dragons and magic. Where would we be if A. A. Milne had not shown us the Hundred Acre Wood inhabited by Winnie-the-Pooh and his friends or if J. R. R. Tolkien had not plotted Frodo's journey to Mordor? The first edition of Tolkien's "The Lord of the Rings" (1954) actually contained three maps: a general map of Middle-earth, a map of the Shire and a detailed map showing Rohan, Gondor and Mordor. Would we lose elements of the story if these maps did not exist?

The mapping of imaginary worlds is as popular as ever today. The Geography and Map Division holds a collection of maps showing places in George R. R. Martin's "A Song of Ice and Fire," a series of books that are the basis for the popular television show, "Game of Thrones." The beautifully illustrated maps depict in detail such places as Westeros, Essos and King's Landing. In an interview at the Edinburgh International Book Festival in August 2014, Martin discussed the influence that Tolkien had had on his work:

"A map of Middle- Earth," Pauline Baynes, based on the cartography of J.R.R. and C.J.R. Tolkien, London, George Allen & Unwin, 1970. Reproduced with permission from HarperCollins Publishers Ltd.

"I revere 'Lord of the Rings.' I reread it every few years; it had an enormous effect on me as a kid. In some sense, when I started this saga I was replying to Tolkien, but even more to his modern imitators … I wanted to combine the wonder and image of Tolkien fantasy with the gloom of historical fiction."

While Martin's story and themes in "A Song of Ice and Fire" are different from Tolkien's in "The Lord of the Rings," the worlds they created consist of similar topography and both depict the journeys of the characters that inhabit them. A careful reader may see a vaguely similar style in Tolkien's map of Middle-earth and Martin's map of the North (North Westeros).

But why collect maps of places that exist only on the pages of books and can come to life in our imaginations? As Professor Albus Dumbledore says in J. K. Rowling's "Harry Potter" series—which itself has inspired many maps— "Of course it is happening inside your head, Harry, but why on earth should that mean that it is not real?"

You can read the entire September/October 2016 issue of the LCM here


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9 Things You Can Learn About Your Ancestors From the Cemetery



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9 Things You Can Learn About Your Ancestors From the Cemetery
// Genealogy Insider

Changing scenery and pleasant temperatures make Fall an especially good time to visit cemeteries (alongside a genealogy buddy for fun and safety). Seeing the gravestone and viewing records in the cemetery office may yield ancestry information you won't find in an online database of burials—although online databases are very helpful, too.

The latest issue of Family Tree Magazine, October/November 2016, has our Genealogy Workbook on cemetery research. You'll also find essential guidance in Family Tree University's two-week course on Doing Cemetery Research (your access to course materials starts as soon as you register).

Here are nine things you can learn about ancestors from the cemetery:
  • name and birth and death dates. Most tombstones have the deceased's name (although sometimes you get the dreaded "his wife") and at least a year of birth and death. But you also might learn parents' names. One of my family cemeteries has a searchable database that includes parents' names, if known. It's the only place I've found parents' names for my third-great-grandmother Elizabeth Butler Norris. (A visit to this cemetery is in order to view records—they may contain information beyond what's in the database.)

  • relationships, either named on the stone or deduced from nearby stones and further research. I found two "mystery men" buried in my family plot, and subsequent research led me to my third-great-grandmother's first marriage. Here's my post about that
  • babies you didn't know to look for, because they were born and died between censuses and/or before official birth records. Some of my family cemeteries have separate "infant" sections, and tiny stones are easily overgrown, so you might find clues by searching in a database or through records in the cemetery office, even if there's no telltale marker in a family plot.
  • maiden names. They may be on a woman's grave marker or on a burial record, if it names parents or if her father or another relative owned the plot. Or you may discover the maiden name by researching those buried near her. It's a bit hard to see in this photo, but my great-great-grandmother's stone has her maiden name, Ladenkoetter:
  • membership in fraternal societies, religious organizations or unions, revealed by symbols on the gravestone. Here's a nice collection of photos of gravestone symbols and their interpretations.  These can lead you to records of the fraternal society.

  • immigrant place of origin. This is one I haven't encountered in my own research, but genealogy experts recommend checking burial records and gravestones for immigrant birth places. I found a photo on the Everyone Has a Story blog of an Irish immigrant's tombstone with his county and parish of birth

  • religion, especially if the person is buried in a cemetery affiliated with a church. If not, a burial record might include a religion or the name of a church where services were held. 

  • cause of death. Rarely, it might be engraved on a headstone, like the examples on this Rootsweb page. They include "was killed by a fall from a building" and "while ... viewing a span of horses he was suddenly kicked by one of them in the lower part of his bowels."

    More likely, though, you'll get clues to point your research in a direction. The same death date on a woman's gravestone and a nearby child's could indicate a mother died in childbirth. Several deaths around the same time might indicate an epidemic. A young man's death during wartime could mean he died in service.
See an outline for Family Tree University's two-week Doing Cemetery Research course by clicking here, and check out the October/November Family Tree Magazine in ShopFamilyTree.com (it's available in print or as a digital download).


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Littoral Combat Ship USS Montgomery Suffers Cracked Hull in Collision with Tugboat



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Littoral Combat Ship USS Montgomery Suffers Cracked Hull in Collision with Tugboat
// gCaptain.com

USS Montgomery (LCS-8). U.S. Navy File PhotoThe U.S. Navy's newest littoral combat ship USS Montgomery has suffered a crack in its aluminum hull after being hit by a tug as the ship sortied from Mayport, Florida ahead of Hurricane Matthew. The incident occurred October 4 and was first reported by Navy Times, which obtained the following statement from the Navy: "USS Montgomery […]

The post Littoral Combat Ship USS Montgomery Suffers Cracked Hull in Collision with Tugboat appeared first on gCaptain.


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Where Was the USS Arizona in World War I?



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Where Was the USS Arizona in World War I?
// Roads to the Great War

The USS Arizona, New York Harbor, 26 December 1918 The battleship USS Arizona is remembered today because of its tragic demise at Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941 and its status as a national memorial. However, it was on the navy rolls for the entirety of America's involvement in the Great War. Advertised as the most modern "super-dreadnought" afloat, with its sister ship, the USS
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Wednesday, October 5, 2016

Secrets of the Cuban Missile Crisis [feedly]



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Secrets of the Cuban Missile Crisis
// UNREDACTED

During recent decades more and more has been learned about the Cuban Missile Crisis, such as the Soviet tactical nuclear weapons in Cuba and the CIA's deployment of saboteurs in Cuba at the time of the crisis.  Nevertheless, U.S. government agencies are still keeping significant elements of the history secret, including most of the agent […]
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Views from Somalia: 23 Years Ago



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Views from Somalia: 23 Years Ago
// Naval History Blog

Today marks the 23rd anniversary of the Battle of Mogadishu, which saw 18 servicemembers killed and many more wounded in the raid on a Somali marketplace to capture two lieutenants of warlord Mohamed Farrah Hassan Aidid. United Nations Operations in Somalia had been ongoing since early 1992 in an effort to stabilize the region wracked by civil war, but the fallout from the mission, chronicled in Mark Bowden's Black Hawk Down: A Story of Modern War, ultimately led to the reevaluation of the United Nations Operation in Somalia and to the eventual discontinuation of that international intervention. The instability and... Read the rest of this entry »
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Singapore Junk Bonds Slump as Chartering Group Swissco Seeks Restructuring



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Singapore Junk Bonds Slump as Chartering Group Swissco Seeks Restructuring
// gCaptain.com

Ships at anchor off Singapore. File photo: Shutterstock/Rasti SedlakBy Netty Ismail and David Yong (Bloomberg) — Singapore's junk-bond market is suffering its worst rout in at least four years as debt restructurings spread among shipping and oil-and-gas service companies. High-yield notes in the local currency from borrowers in Singapore slid 1.9 percent last quarter, the most in an IHS Markit Ltd. index going […]

The post Singapore Junk Bonds Slump as Chartering Group Swissco Seeks Restructuring appeared first on gCaptain.


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Charged offenses as propensity evidence in a members trial found harmless by the Army CCA



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Charged offenses as propensity evidence in a members trial found harmless by the Army CCA
// CAAFlog

In United States v. Hills, 75 M.J. 350 (C.A.A.F. Jun. 27, 2016) (CAAFlog case page), a unanimous CAAF held that charged offenses may not be used under Mil. R. Evid. 413 to prove an accused's propensity to commit the charged offenses, and also that the standard instruction given to members regarding how to handle such propensity undermines the presumption of innocence. Since deciding Hills, CAAF has summarily remanded five additional cases for reconsideration in light of Hills.

Separate from those remands, but also the wake of Hills, the Air Force, Army, and Navy-Marine Corps CCA have each decided cases involving the use of charged offenses as evidence to prove the accused's propensity to commit the charged offenses.

In United States v. Hukill, No. 20140939 (A. Ct. Crim. App. Aug. 16, 2016) (discussed here), the Army CCA concluded that CAAF's decision in Hills does not apply in judge-alone trials.

In United States v. Ellis, No. 201500163 (N.M. Ct. Crim. App. Aug. 30, 2016) (discussed here) the Navy-Marine Corps CCA applied Hills to reverse the appellant's convictions of sexual assault upon two different women whose allegations were separated in time by nine months but shared numerous similarities. Ellis was tried before members.

In United States v. Phillips, No. 38771 (A.F. Ct. Crim. App. Sep. 7, 2016) (discussed here), the Air Force CCA reached a similar conclusion to that reached by the Army CCA in Hukill, affirming sex offense convictions in a case where a military judge alone considered the charged offenses as propensity evidence.

Now, in United States v. Bonilla, No. 20131084 (A. Ct. Crim. App. Sep 30, 2016) (link to slip op.), a three-judge panel of the Army CCA goes a step further and affirms convictions by members despite the prosecution's use of the charged offenses for propensity purposes. Significantly, similar to the facts of Hills, the case involved a single alleged victim where multiple alleged sexual assaults were charged and then each used as proof of the others. The military judge also used the standard Benchbook instruction that CAAF found constitutionally defective in Hills. However, the Army CCA finds these errors to be harmless, distinguishing the facts of Bonilla from those of Hills on five bases:

Writing for the panel, Senior Judge Tozzi concludes:

While we find the military judge's instruction created an error rising to a constitutional dimension, the similarity between Hills and this case ends with the propensity instruction. Hills involved two offenses against a single victim that occurred over the span of two hours on one night. The case relied heavily on the testimony of the victim who, at the time of assault, was heavily intoxicated and in and out of consciousness. DNA evidence in the case proved inconclusive. The present case is distinguishable on many fronts.

First, appellant raped, sodomized, and sexually assaulted Ms. AM on multiple occasions over a period of eight and one-half years.

Second, Ms. AM's memories of appellant's numerous assaults were clear and compelling, even though she at one point recanted allegations she made concerning the abuse. Ms. AM's testimony was supported by DNA evidence, Ms. AM's physical injuries, and a blood stain found on Ms. AM's bedroom floor. Additionally, expert testimony was provided to explain recantation is most common in children who are abused by a family member.

Third, the government's burden of proof beyond a reasonable doubt was reinforced extensively during voir dire, which alone spanned over 500 pages of transcript. At the outset, the military judge instructed the panel of the government's burden of proof. When then asked, the members indicated no disagreement with this rule of law. Throughout voir dire, the military judge and counsel asked multiple questions that reinforced that the burden of proof beyond a reasonable doubt rested with the government. In summary, the extensive voir dire clearly reinforced for the members that the burden of proof beyond a reasonable doubt rested with the government and never shifted to appellant.

Fourth, trial counsel did not reference propensity evidence in his argument.

Fifth, the panel did not appear to be confused by the military judge's instructions or as to the burden of proof. When queried by the military judge, the members had no questions about the findings instructions. Indeed, the members returned mixed findings showing they held the government to its burden of proof.

Viewing all of these factors, we are convinced beyond a reasonable doubt that the propensity instruction did not contribute to the findings of guilty or appellant's sentence, and any instructional error was harmless beyond a reasonable doubt.

Slip op. at 13-14.


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Tuesday, October 4, 2016

In Books: Deadly Straits by R.E. McDermott [feedly]



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In Books: Deadly Straits by R.E. McDermott
// gCaptain.com

Deadly Straights by R.E. McDermottFor the sake of full disclosure, I am not a huge fans of thrillers, particularly thrillers involving ships. The plots often strike me as implausible and the descriptions of the ships and ship operations often border on the laughable. (Too often, they leap across the border.) This is not the case however with R.E. McDermott's Deadly Straits.

The post In Books: Deadly Straits by R.E. McDermott appeared first on gCaptain.


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Monday, October 3, 2016

A Glimmer of Hope for the Historic Falls of Clyde? [feedly]



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A Glimmer of Hope for the Historic Falls of Clyde?
// Old Salt Blog - a virtual port of call for all those who love the sea

Things look grim for the 1878 sailing ship Falls of Clyde, the last surviving iron-hulled, four-masted full-rigged ship, and the only remaining sail-driven oil tanker.  There is still a glimmer of hope that she can be saved, but time is running out. Recently, a campaign has gotten underway to return the ship to Scotland where it was built 138 years ago.

On Friday, an administrative hearing upheld the State of Hawaii's Department of Transportation's right to take control of the ship from its current owners, the nonprofit Friends of the Falls of Clyde. In June, the DOT revoked the ship's permit to moor at Pier 7 in Honolulu harbor and then impounded the ship in August. The Friends of the Falls of Clyde has owned the ship for the last eight years but has not raised the necessary funds to drydock her, as the first step in ship's restoration. The concern now is that the State of Hawaii may choose to scrap or sink the Falls of Clyde.

Now, a campaign is underway to return the Falls of Clyde to Scotland where she was built in 1878. A recent Facebook post by David O'Neil:

The post A Glimmer of Hope for the Historic Falls of Clyde? appeared first on Old Salt Blog.


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This Video of a Lab Simulated Rogue Wave Will Make Your Palms Sweat



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This Video of a Lab Simulated Rogue Wave Will Make Your Palms Sweat
// gCaptain.com

screenshot-1It's a sailor's worst nightmare. A monster wave that comes out of nowhere, two to three times bigger than the others. In certain cases, waves like this are capable of swallowing a ship whole. Yet to this day we still don't know much about rogue waves or how they form. Actually, most of what we […]

The post This Video of a Lab Simulated Rogue Wave Will Make Your Palms Sweat appeared first on gCaptain.


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Families Evacuating Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba [feedly]



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Families Evacuating Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
// U.S. Navy News Top Stories

Approximately 700 spouses and children are evacuating from Naval Station Guantanamo Bay (NSGB), Cuba during preparations for the arrival of Hurricane Matthew.
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Recommended: The 26th Yankee Division at ARMY HISTORY MAGAZINE



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Recommended: The 26th Yankee Division at ARMY HISTORY MAGAZINE
// Roads to the Great War

I just got around to reading the latest (summer 2016) issue of Army History — they have a included a truly unique article on the graffiti created in various caves and quarries where the men of New England found themselves of the Western Front. Those men were in a lot of  different places and saw a lot of action — the 26th was among the earliest AEF divisions to arrive in France. The
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This Week in Military Justice – October 2, 2016



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This Week in Military Justice – October 2, 2016
// CAAFlog

This week at SCOTUS: I'm not aware of any military justice developments at the Supreme Court, where I'm tracking three cases:

This week at CAAF: The next scheduled oral argument at CAAF is on October 11, 2016.

This week at the ACCA: The Army CCA will hear oral argument in one case this week:

Thursday, October 6, 2016, at 11 a.m.: United States v. Aguigui, No. 20140260

Issue: WHETHER DEFENSE COUNSEL WAS INEFFECTIVE BY FAILING TO OBJECT TO INADMISSIBLE HEARSAY, PREJUDICIAL UNCHARGED MISCONDUCT, AND IMPROPERLY IMMUNIZED TESTIMONY AND FAILING TO PUT ON A MITIGATION CASE?

This week at the AFCCA: The Air Force CCA will hear oral argument in United States v. Voorhees, No. 38336, on Friday, October 7, 2016, at 1 p.m. No additional case information is available on the CCA's website.

This week at the CGCCA: The Coast Guard CCA's oral argument schedule shows no scheduled oral arguments.

This week at the NMCCA: The next scheduled oral argument at the Navy-Marine Corps CCA is on October 20, 2016.


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