Tuesday, November 29, 2016

USS BENNINGTON-(PG4)

DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY -- NAVAL HISTORICAL CENTER
805 KIDDER BREESE SE -- WASHINGTON NAVY YARD
WASHINGTON DC 20374-5060

Photo # NH 89081:  Removing the dead from USS Bennington following her boiler explosion, at San Diego, California, 21 July 1905

Online Library of Selected Images:
-- EVENTS -- The 1900s -- 1905

Boiler Explosion on USS Bennington, 21 July 1905

At about 10:30 a.m. on 21 July 1905 the gunboat Bennington suffered one of the Navy's worst peacetime disasters. She had arrived at San Diego, California, just two days earlier, after a difficult seventeen-day voyage from the Hawaiian Islands. Though both the ship and her men could have used a rest, they were soon ordered back to sea to assist the monitor Wyoming, which had broken down and needed a tow.

While steam was being raised, much of Bennington's crew, having completing the hard and dirty job of coaling, were cleaning their ship and themselves. Below decks, an improperly closed steam line valve, oily feed water and a malfunctioning safety valve conspired to generate steam pressures far beyond the boilers' tolerance. Suddenly, one of them exploded. Men and equipment were hurled into the air, living compartments and deck space filled with scalding steam, and the ship's hull was opened to the sea. But for quick work by the tug Santa Fe, which beached Bennington in relatively shallow water, the gunboat would probably have sunk. As it was, she was so badly damaged as to be not worth repairing. Even worse, more than sixty of her crew had been killed outright or were so severely injured that they did not long survive.

The number of casualties overhelmed the then-small city of San Diego's hospitals, and badly burned Sailors had to be cared for in improvised facilities largely staffed by volunteers. Local morticians were hard pressed to prepare the Bennington's dead for burial. On the 23rd of July, the great majority were interred at the Army's Fort Rosecrans, located on the Point Loma heights overlooking the entrance to San Diego Harbor and what would, years later, become the North Island Naval Air Station.

Despite the awful death toll, which far exceeded that sustained by the Navy in the Spanish-American War, and sometimes lurid rumors of misconduct on the part of some members of Bennington's engineering force, official investigations concluded that the tragedy had not resulted from negligence. Eleven surviving crewmen were awarded the Medal of Honor for " extraordinary heroism displayed at the time of the explosion". USS Benningtonwas raised, but remained inactive and unrepaired until sold in 1910.

This page features, and provides links to, all the views we have concerning the 21 July 1905 boiler explosion on USS Bennington (Gunboat # 4).

For more images related to the USS Bennington boiler explosion and its aftermath, see:

  • Boiler Explosion on USS Bennington, 21 July 1905 -- Part II;
  • USS Bennington Monument, San Diego, California; and
  • USS Bennington Monument, San Diego, California -- Part II.

    For pictures and information concerning the ship's last Commanding Officer, and a sailor who was awarded the Medal of Honor for his conduct at the time of her boiler explosion, see:

  • Rear Admiral Lucien Young, USN, (1852-1912); and
  • Seaman Edward William Boers, USN, (1884-1929).


    If you want higher resolution reproductions than the Online Library's digital images, see: How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions.

    Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

    Photo #: NH 89081

    USS Bennington
     (Gunboat # 4)

    Removing the dead from the ship, following her boiler explosion at San Diego, California, 21 July 1905.
    Photographed and published on a stereograph card by C.H. Graves, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
    The inscription published on the reverse of the original card is provided on Photo #: NH 89081 (extended caption).

    Courtesy of Commander Donald J. Robinson, USN(MSC), 1979

    U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

    Online Image: 105KB; 605 x 675 pixels

    A stereo pair version of this image is available as Photo # NH 89081-A

    Online Image of stereo pair: 63KB; 675 x 360 pixels

      
    Photo #: NH 100929

    USS Bennington
     (Gunboat # 4)

    Halftone reproduction of a photograph, published as a postal card by Wood's Print, Los Angeles, California, showing the ship partially sunk in San Diego harbor following her 21 July 1905 boiler explosion.
    Note the sailboats in the foreground, among them one named Nellie.

    Courtesy of H.E. ("Ed") Coffer, 1986.

    U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

    Online Image: 83KB; 465 x 765 pixels

      
    Photo #: NH 102778-KN (color)

    USS Bennington (Gunboat # 4)

    Fine-screen reproduction of a photograph showing the ship partially sunk, soon after her 21 July 1905 boiler explosion in San Diego harbor, California. It was published on a postal card by the Special View Company, Los Angeles, California.

    Donation of H.E. ("Ed") Coffer.

    U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

    Online Image: 58KB; 740 x 485 pixels

      
    Photo #: NH 85695

    USS Bennington
     (Gunboat # 4)

    Salvage party at work on the partially sunken ship, in San Diego harbor, California, after her 21 July 1905 boiler explosion.

    Donation of William L. Graham, 1977.

    U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

    Online Image: 91KB; 740 x 525 pixels

      
    Photo #: NH 85694

    USS Bennington
     (Gunboat # 4)

    Partially sunk in San Diego harbor, California, after her 21 July 1905 boiler explosion.

    Donation of William L. Graham, 1977.

    U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

    Online Image: 68KB; 740 x 515 pixels

      
    Photo #: NH 105306-KN (color)

    USS Bennington (Gunboat # 4)

    Partially sunk in San Diego Bay, California, two hours after her 21 July 1905 boiler explosion.
    This fine-screen halftone photograph, with a commemorative message, is printed on a postcard published soon after the tragedy by Sewards' Post Cards, Los Angeles, California.
    For a view of the reverse of the original postcard, see: Photo # NH 105306-A-KN.

    Courtesy of Harrell E. ("Ed") Coffer, 2007.

    U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

    Online Image size: 98KB; 740 x 500 pixels

      
    Photo #: NH 105306-A-KN (color)

    USS Bennington (Gunboat # 4)

    Reverse of a postcard published circa mid-1905 by Sewards' Post Cards, Los Angeles, California, commemorating the 21 July 1905 boiler explosion that killed many of USS Bennington's crew members.
    For a view of the front of the original postcard, featuring a photograph of Bennington taken shortly after the tragedy, see: Photo # NH 105306-KN.

    Courtesy of Harrell E. ("Ed") Coffer, 2007.

    U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

    Online Image size: 88KB; 740 x 500 pixels

      
    Photo #: NH 105307-KN (color)

    USS Bennington (Gunboat # 4)

    Partially sunk in San Diego Bay, California, following her 21 July 1905 boiler explosion.
    This fine-screen halftone photograph, with a commemorative message, is printed on a postcard published soon after the tragedy by Sewards' Post Cards, Los Angeles, California.
    The reverse of the original postcard is essentially identical to that seen in Photo # NH 105306-A-KN.

    Courtesy of Harrell E. ("Ed") Coffer, 2007.

    U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

    Online Image size: 93KB; 740 x 495 pixels

      
    Photo #: NH 95245-KN (color)

    USS Bennington (Gunboat # 4)

    Partially sunk in San Diego Bay, California, soon after her 21 July 1905 boiler explosion.
    This fine-screen halftone image was published on a postal card by Wood's Print, Los Angeles, California.

    Courtesy of H.E. ("Ed") Coffer, 1983.

    U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

    Online Image: 64KB; 740 x 485 pixels

      
    Photo #: NH 85696

    USS Bennington
     (Gunboat # 4)

    Salvage party at work on the partially sunken ship, in San Diego harbor, California, after her 21 July 1905 boiler explosion.
    Bennington's National Ensign is flying at half staff.

    Donation of William L. Graham, 1977.

    U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

    Online Image: 79KB; 740 x 530 pixels

      
    Photo #: NH 56383-B

    USS Bennington
     (Gunboat # 4)

    Halftone reproduction of a photograph, showing the ship as her engine room was being pumped out, soon after her 21 July 1905 boiler explosion at San Diego, California. Note her National Ensign flying at half-staff.

    Donation of Rear Admiral Ammen Farenholt, USN (Medical Corps), November 1931.

    U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

    Online Image: 102KB; 690 x 660 pixels

      
    Photo #: NH 56383-C

    USS Bennington
     (Gunboat # 4)

    Halftone reproduction of a photograph, showing the ship half sunk and beached at San Diego, California, soon after her 21 July 1905 boiler explosion.
    A steam launch from Bennington is in the foreground.

    Donation of Rear Admiral Ammen Farenholt, USN (Medical Corps), November 1931.

    U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

    Online Image: 78KB; 740 x 355 pixels

      
    Photo #: NH 56383-A

    USS Bennington
     (Gunboat # 4)

    Halftone reproduction of a photograph, showing the ship's starboard side, amidships, as she was beached at San Diego, California, soon after her 21 July 1905 boiler explosion. A disabled six-inch gun is in the center of the image.

    Donation of Rear Admiral Ammen Farenholt, USN (Medical Corps), November 1931.

    U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

    Online Image: 98KB; 740 x 585 pixels

      

    For more images related to the USS Bennington boiler explosion and its aftermath, see:

  • Boiler Explosion on USS Bennington, 21 July 1905 -- Part II;
  • USS Bennington Monument, San Diego, California; and
  • USS Bennington Monument, San Diego, California -- Part II.


    If you want higher resolution reproductions than the Online Library's digital images, see: How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions.


     Return to Naval Historical Center home page.

    Page made 4 March 2005
    New images added 4 December 2007

  • Monday, November 28, 2016

    Rarely Told Pearl Harbor Stories of Female Military Nurses

    You By Katie Lange
    DoD News, Defense Media Activity

    Teresa Stauffer Foster was strolling through a garden near Hawaii's Tripler Hospital on a quiet Sunday morning when a low-flying plane approached. The pilot waved in her direction, so naturally, the Army nurse waved back.

    Pearl Harbor nurse Teresa Stauffer in her formal Army attire in the early 1940s. Photo courtesy of Winnie Woll

    Pearl Harbor nurse Teresa Stauffer in her formal Army attire in the early 1940s. Photo courtesy of Winnie Woll

    A few minutes later, the attack on Pearl Harbor began. Foster didn't realize it at the time, but that plane was one of the many Japanese bombers that pulverized U.S. battleships and aircraft.

    It's one of many stories remembered by military nurses who survived the attacks on Dec. 7, 1941, although you probably haven't heard them much.

    "You hear stories about Pearl Harbor, and they're all about the men. You hear very few stories about the women," said Winnie Woll, Foster's daughter.

    Woll, 73, is actually named for two of her mom's best friends from Pearl Harbor, who were also nurses. She now gives lectures to spread the stories of how they were pioneers of their time, having joined the services long before the Women's Army Corps and the Navy's Women's Reserve program (WAVES) were established in 1942.

    Rules for Military Women

    When Woll's mother joined, there were stringent rules for the women who wanted to enlist.

    "The women had to be single. The minute they were married, they were out the door," Woll said, noting that the need for more nurses eventually led to a rule change. "In 1943, that was the first time you could marry and still legally be in the military – until you had your first child. Then you're out again."

    Foster was sent to Pearl Harbor six months before the attacks. On the morning of Dec. 7, she was walking with other nurses who had finished their shifts when that plane flew past.

    "The man was waving at them. And you know what you do in a situation like that – you wave back, because you don't really realize what's happening," Woll said. They did quickly after that, though, and were ordered back to their units.

    Woll said the nurses got to work helping patients who were carted in, often marking their foreheads with lipstick to help with triage. "If it was somebody they couldn't save, they had to put them off to the side and go on and work with whoever they could."

    Tripler General Hospital around the time of the Dec. 7, 1941, Pearl Harbor attacks. U.S. Army photo

    Tripler General Hospital around the time of the Dec. 7, 1941, Pearl Harbor attacks. U.S. Army photo

    Keeping the Past in the Past 

    In today's era of connectivity, where people tend to post their experiences to social media constantly, it's hard to imagine a time when people didn't overtly share their thoughts and feelings. But the World War II generation is well-known for that stoicism, with many of them never discussing what they went through.

    "It traumatized them to the point where they didn't want to share what happened. They just wanted to forget it," Woll said.

    She has made it her mission to give a voice to the stories of the Pearl Harbor nurses, one of which was uncovered only by accident.

    A Fluke Finding

    Ann Danyo (Willgrube) during her Navy Nurse Corps days. Photo courtesy of Joe Danyo

    Ann Danyo (Willgrube) during her Navy Nurse Corps days. Photo courtesy of Joe Danyo

    Ann Danyo Willgrube joined the Navy Nurse Corps in 1940. She was an operating room nurse on the newly commissioned hospital ship USS Solace when the war began. But she didn't share anything about her military life with her family. Her brother, Joe Danyo, who was 8 when Pearl Harbor was bombed, said he didn't even know she'd been there until the late 1950s.

    "She never talked about anything regarding her career," Danyo said. "She was a dynamo … but she just plain refused to talk about the past."

    So needless to say, he never expected to find a letter detailing what had happened to her that day. But he did, as he was cleaning out her house in the mid-1980s.

    "I was surprised to find that," Danyo said.

    The letter was addressed to a high school student who was doing a report on Pearl Harbor and had learned she'd been there. The teen wanted to hear her story, so it was then – in 1981 – that she finally decided to tell it.

    Smoke, Explosions and Shaking Ships

    In the letter, Willgrube talked about being "the envy of all the nurses" because she was assigned to the Solace – a cushy assignment – only 18 months after enlisting. The ship arrived in Pearl Harbor in late October 1941 and was docked at Ford Island near several of the battleships. All was going well until 7:55 a.m. on Dec. 7, when Willgrube was jarred awake by what she initially thought was a boiler explosion.

    The USS Solace played an integral role in helping survivors during the Pearl Harbor attacks, as well as many other campaigns throughout the South Pacific during World War II. Photo courtesy of Joe Danyo

    The USS Solace played an integral role in helping survivors during the Pearl Harbor attacks, as well as many other campaigns throughout the South Pacific during World War II. Photo courtesy of Joe Danyo

    "The ship shook, and everyone ran out on deck to see what happened. I looked out the porthole in my room and saw smoke pouring out of the [USS] Arizona. The next minute, our chief nurse burst into the room and told me to dress quickly and report to the quarterdeck for duty because the Japs were bombing us," Willgrube wrote.

    The Solace's nurses worked around the clock that day to care for more than 130 patients who were brought aboard, 70 percent of whom were burn victims. She said they were too busy to worry about the roar of the guns, the shaking of the ship and the planes flying overhead.

    The surprise attack destroyed the Arizona, Oklahoma and Utah, and damaged several other U.S. ships and aircraft. More than 2,400 people were killed – half of whom had been on the Arizona, which still sits at the bottom of Pearl Harbor to this day. It was the worst attack America had ever seen, but Willgrube said it took days to realize how bad it actually was.

    "We were so thankful that the Japanese did not realize how they crippled us, because they could have taken over the islands had they known the truth," Willgrube wrote.

    Passing the Memories On

    As for why Willgrube finally decided to share her story? So America remains prepared to defend itself.

    "We never had disaster drills, yet when we realized that we were actually at war, every person on board that ship seemed to know instinctively what to do," Willgrube said. "It simply proves how important discipline in the military is – it not only saves lives but wins wars, too."

    This Pearl Harbor Survivors Association commemorative book belonged to Army nurse Teresa Stauffer (Foster). Now it's one of her daughter's keepsakes. DoD photo by Katie Lange

    This Pearl Harbor Survivors Association commemorative book belonged to Army nurse Teresa Stauffer (Foster). Now it's one of her daughter's keepsakes. DoD photo by Katie Lange

    Willgrube was one of the first women to become a Navy shellback, one of many firsts that she would be part of over the years.

    "When I entered the Navy, nurses had no specific rank but enjoyed the privileges of officers. In 1942, we received relative rank, and in 1947, we were classified as Nurse Corps with the same rank and privileges as the other officers," Willgrube wrote.

    After 27 years of service, she retired as a commander and married retired Medical Services Corps Cmdr. Wayne Willgrube, who was also aboard the Solace during the Pearl Harbor attacks.

    Willgrube died in 1988 after a battle with Parkinson's disease. She had some pretty interesting stories to tell in her letter, including about rumors that ran rampant directly after the attacks. To read her entire letter, click here.

    Winnie Woll, a member of the Sons and Daughters of Pearl Harbor Survivors group, with her mother, Army nurse Teresa Stauffer Foster, during a prior Pearl Harbor remembrance ceremony. Photo courtesy of Winnie Woll

    Winnie Woll, a member of the Sons and Daughters of Pearl Harbor Survivors group, with her mother, Army nurse Teresa Stauffer Foster, during a return visit to Hawaii in 1992. Photo courtesy of Winnie Woll

    Woll shared the details of a few other nurses' experiences, too, including a love story, a returned Purple Heart, and one involving Gen. George Patton. You can check those out here.

    As the Greatest Generation continues to dwindle, who knows how many amazing stories have been lost to time. That's why it's up to us and people like Woll and Danyo to share as many of these stories as we can. So if you have a family story to share, make sure you tell it to anyone willing to listen!

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    ———-

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    Check out these other posts:



    Original Page: http://www.dodlive.mil/index.php/2016/11/rarely-told-pearl-harbor-stories-of-female-military-nurses/



    Sent from my iPad

    This Week in Military Justice – November 27, 2016

    This week at SCOTUS: Last week the Court requested a response to the cert. petition in Howell. The response is due on December 23, 2016. I'm not aware of any other military justice developments at the Supreme Court, where I'm tracking two cases:

    This week at CAAF: The next scheduled oral argument at CAAF is on December 6, 2016.

    This week at the ACCA: The next scheduled oral argument at the Army CCA is on December 13, 2016.

    This week at the AFCCA: The Air Force CCA will hear oral argument in United States v. Walters on Wednesday, November 30, 2016, at 1 p.m. No additional information is available on the CCA's website.

    This week at the CGCCA: The Coast Guard CCA's oral argument schedule shows no scheduled oral arguments.

    This week at the NMCCA: The Navy-Marine Corps CCA's website shows no scheduled oral arguments.



    Original Page: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/caaflog/~3/r891Pj9h_CE/



    Sent from my iPad

    Maritime Monday for Nov 28th, 2016: The Ugly Chickens

    don-edwards-in-tug-boating-facebook
    photo by Donald Edwards in Tug Boating Facebook group (click to see full size)

    turkeyatlantic

    Why Americans Call Turkey 'Turkey'

    How a New World bird came to be named after countries halfway around the globe

    The Atlantic – Within the turkey lies the tangled history of the world. OK, not quite. But not far off, either.

    "Turkey" the bird is native to North America. But "turkey" the word is a geographic mess—a tribute to the vagaries of colonial trade and conquest. As you might have suspected, the English term for the avian creature likely comes from Turkey the country. Or, more precisely, from Turkish merchants in the 15th and 16th centuries. keep reading

    rev
    Atlas V launch with GOES-R. Photo Credit: Michael McCabe / SpaceFlight Insider

    Powerful Next-Gen Weather Satellite Launches to Begin Forecasting 'Revolution'

    "Our nation now has a new weather sentinel, and the data it will produce will soon be vital to our severe storm prediction and warnings," said Lisa Callahan, vice president and general manager of Civil Space at Lockheed Martin Space Systems. "The data will not only keep our citizens out of harm's way but will also be used across the Americas."  more on SpaceFlight Insider

    revsat
    Artist's illustration of the GOES-R weather satellite in space. GOES-R launched on Nov. 19, 2016, and will reach its final geostationary orbit about two weeks later (at which point its name will change to GOES-16). Credit: NASA

    The GOES-R weather satellite lifted off from Florida's Cape Canaveral Air Force Station today (Nov. 19) at 6:42 p.m. EST (2342 GMT), riding a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket to orbit. The spectacular launch, which lit up the Florida evening sky, occurred about one hour later than planned due to issues with the rocket and launch range that were swiftly resolved.

    GOES-R is the first of four new advanced weather satellites that are, somewhat confusingly, collectively known as GOES-R. The U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), which manages the GOES-R program, is expecting big things from all four of these spacecraft.  more on space.com

    forc
    Atlas Obscura

    How a Father And Son Helped Create Weather Forecasting as We Know It

    It's an almost supernatural ability that most of us take for granted: at any given time, almost anywhere in the world, we can know the weather of the future.

    It wasn't always this way. Though the very first committee dedicated to collecting and mapping weather data—the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia—was formed in 1831, all of the maps they produced had to be drawn after weather had already occurred. Predicting the weather remained largely based on superstition, like the famous "red sky at night, sailor's delight" rhyme.  keep reading

    cumu
    A cirrocumulus cloud study by Luke Howard (1803-11) (© Science Museum/Science & Society Picture Library)

    How the Naming of Clouds Changed the Skies of Art

    The clouds in many 19th-century European paintings look drastically different than those in the 18th century. There are layers to their texture, with whisps of cirrus clouds flying over billowing cumulus, and stratus hovering low. Clouds weren't classified by type until 1802, and their subsequent study influenced artists from John Constable to J. M. W. Turner.  keep reading

    neptune
    Found Photo: His Royal Highness Holds Inspection of the Crew; 10/20/1930 (Ed Engel)
    clothing
    See also: Portrait of Arthur Phillip, Francis Wheatley, 1786, National Portrait Gallery UK

    GoFundMe: Anglo-American Maritime Clothing, 1680-1740

    Maritime clothing in the Age of Sail is a topic that only receives minimal attention in the greater history of the maritime world. For those interested in the attire of mariners during the latter half of the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, learning about sailor's garb in the time preceding that period brings further context and understanding to the latter period. In 2015, I completed and successfully defended my master's thesis for the Maritime Studies Department at East Carolina University concerning the attire of common sailors and pirates for the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries.

    However, before I take my thesis to a publisher, I need to conduct more research so I can provide my readers the best work possible. To conduct said research, I need to go to the archives in London for a 3-week research trip.  Keep reading

    hmsvictorious
    Royal Navy aircraft carrier, HMS Indomitable, sometime during the 1950's – photo by Steve Given
    kensington
    The Kensington Runestone – Runestone Museum; Alexandria, Minnesota

    A simple farmer did not expect to discover what appeared to be an ancient stone with Viking style graphic symbols engraved on it in the state of Minnesota. Many people were saying he was lying or just simply crazy. Yet around 100 years later, more discoveries have proved the stele was actually the real McCoy.

    It was, however, actually left there by the Knights Templar instead of the Norsemen.

    The front face had read:

    "Eight Gotlanders and 22 Norwegians on reclaiming/acquisition journey far west from Vinland. We had a camp by two shelters one day's journey north from this stone. We were fishing one day.

    After we came home we found 10 men red with blood and death. Ave Maria. Save from evil." Engraved on the side of the stone were the words, "There are 10 men by the sea to look after our ships 14 days journey from this island. Year 1362." 

    keep reading

    VIDEO: Lake Superior Yields Astonishing Intact Shipwreck from 1884
    morecambe
    mechanicallandscapes.com: The Sands, Morecambe, Showing The Majestic at Wards Yard

    Shipbreaking in Morecambe

    Today, Morecambe isn't known for much really. It always played second fiddle to Blackpool in the battle for Lancashire's seaside tourists, and today there is even less to see of merit other than the fabulously restored art deco Midland hotel, and of course the bronze statue of Eric Morecambe.

    The town wasn't an obvious choice of location for shipbreaking, but came about due to the Midland Railway steamer services vacating the stone jetty for nearby Heysham. The jetty was offered for lease, and Sheffield based TW Ward moved in, in 1905.  keep reading

    venice-canal
    A canal being drained and cleaned in Venice, Italy, 1956 – The Vintage News (click to see full size)
    pearly
    via messynessychic.com

    The Other English Royals

    Have you ever heard of the Pearly Kings and Queens? A unique subculture of the English capital and an integral part of its heritage; the Pearlies are the unsung monarchs of Britain with a story worth telling. It begins with a shipwreck and thousands of imported pearl button that washed up along the River Thames.

    As the story goes, the impressionable Henry, keen to emulate his local heroes, was wondering down the mud banks of the Thames when he came across the shipwrecked cargo of a sunken Japanese boat and thousands of imported pearl buttons. Croft covered his entire worn out dress suit and top hat with 60,000 pearl buttons, sewing them in artful patterns that spelled out Robin Hood-esque slogans like, "All for charity and pity the poor". keep reading

    haulingmf
    VIDEO – Hauling the MAYFLOWER II at Mystic Seaport – November 2016

    Hauling the Mayflower II at Mystic Seaport

    Old Salt Blog – I hope everyone who celebrates the American holiday is having a wonderful Thanksgiving. The holiday is associated with a group of English settlers now known as the Pilgrims who arrived on the Massachusetts coast around 1620 on the ship Mayflower. Now, the Mayflower II, a replica built in Devon, England and sailed to United States in 1957, is undergoing an extensive renovation and rebuild. She was hauled last Friday at the Henry B. duPont Preservation Shipyard at Mystic Seaport. more

    Buckingham on the stocks at Deptford, John Cleveley the Elder, 1752, National Maritime Museum
    Buckingham on the stocks at Deptford, John Cleveley the Elder, 1752, National Maritime Museum

    Cleveley was a shipwright by trade, and many of his paintings depict ships on the stocks. He also populates his paintings with sailors and people. Unlike many other marine artists of the time, Cleveley never separated the image of the ship from the people who built and sailed them.  keep reading

    chrysler
    Manhattan skyline with the Chrysler Building still under construction, May 12, 1930 / William Frange, photographer
    nyharb
    Capt. Thomas J. Keating Jr., a member of the Sandy Hook Pilots Association, guides about 150 ships in and out of New York Harbor each year. Join him aboard one of the world's largest ocean liners. By JAKE NAUGHTON, NIKO KOPPEL and KAITLYN MULLIN

    The Channel Masters of New York Harbor

    ABOARD THE PILOT BOAT NEW JERSEY — A speed of 7 knots at sea is equal to about 8 miles per hour on land, which doesn't sound very fast.
    That is not how it feels 15 miles or so southeast of the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge, where the Queen Mary 2 is heading out into the Atlantic. Capt. Thomas J. Keating Jr. emerges from a door in the belly of the vessel, an ocean liner that is about the length of the Empire State Building if it were turned on its side.

    keep reading on NY Times

    coriol
    British Royal Navy minesweeper HMS Coriolanus – photo by michal.sevecek

    On 5 May 1945, the Shakespeare-class trawler HMS Coriolanus hit a mine while it was sweeping the sea in front of Novigrad; Adriatic Campaign of World War II

    see also

    deep
    This video from RealLifeLore offers a bit of perspective

    Try To Wrap Your Head Around How Mind-Bendingly Deep the Ocean Is

    popularmechanics.com – Less than one measly percent of all the known shipwrecks in the world have actually been explored. There are a whole multitude of reasons for this but not the least among them is that the ocean is unfathomably huge. Not only does it cover over 70 percent of the Earth's surface, it also stretches far further down than anything on dry land stretches up. Given how little of the ocean floor is actually accurately mapped, there could be much deeper parts that we just don't know about yet.

    houseboat
    This homemade houseboat remains mostly intact, despite its 1,900 mile journey – photo Declan Murphy/BBC

    Mystery as Canadian houseboat washes up on Irish Beach – BBC News

    A houseboat believed to have been built by an environmentalist in Canada has washed up on an Irish beach. The vessel is thought to have drifted across the Atlantic, and was spotted as late as September in Portugal Cove-St Philip's in Newfoundland. The coastguard was alerted by a member of the public who spotted the caravan-sized structure floating on the coast. more on the BBC

    Battered houseboat washes up in Co Mayo after apparently drifting across Atlantic

    barcos
    Mar del Plata, Argentina – photo by Rodolfo Frino
    cunw
    Museum of Found Photographs

    Adventures of the BlackgangMaritime Monday Archives



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    FTC Unveils Mobile-Friendly Financial Readiness Website for Military Members and Personal Financial Managers


    The Federal Trade Commission unveiled a financial readiness website designed for mobile devices to help members of the military community navigate personal financial decisions in light of the unique challenges they face, such as frequent relocations and deployment.

    When military families make a permanent change of station, they need to rent or buy a new place to live, manage money while on the move, and be vigilant about dealing with businesses in an unfamiliar locale.

    The FTC created Military.Consumer.gov and teamed up with the Department of Defense, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, Military Saves, and many other partners to help servicemembers and their families with personal finances.

    The website is optimized for use on a mobile device. For example, if a servicemember is looking to buy a car, manage their money during deployment, or continue their education, they can find mobile-friendly tips quickly from their smart phone.

    A new toolkit, “Tools for Personal Financial Managers”, provides personal financial managers, counselors, command, and others in the military community practical financial tips they can share with service members. The toolkit resources are in the public domain so individuals and organizations can share them with friends, family, colleagues and customers. They also can use the information in newsletters or on social media sites.

    The Federal Trade Commission works to promote competition, and protect and educate consumers. You can learn more about consumer topics and file a consumer complaint online or by calling 1-877-FTC-HELP (382-4357). Like the FTC on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, read our blogs and subscribe to press releases for the latest FTC news and resources.

    Contact Information

    MEDIA CONTACT:
    Peter Kaplan
    Office of Public Affairs
    202-326-2334

    STAFF CONTACT:
    Carol Kando-Pineda
    Bureau of Consumer Protection
    202-326-3152

    More news from the FTC >>

    IRS warns of a new tax bill scam

    IRS warns of a new tax bill scam

    We certainly understand if the latest IRS imposter scam makes you queasy: it involves a fake IRS tax notice that claims you owe money as a result of the Affordable Care Act.

    The IRS says the fake notices are designed to look like real IRS CP2000 notices, which the agency sends if information it receives about your income doesn’t match the information reported on your tax return. The IRS says many people have gotten the bogus notices, which usually claim you owe money for the previous tax year under the Affordable Care Act.

    It’s one of many IRS imposter scams that have popped up. As tax season nears, we’ll see more. The good news? There are red-flag warnings that can help you avoid becoming a victim. For example, the IRS will never:

    • Initiate contact with you by email or through social media.
    • Ask you to pay using a gift card, pre-paid debit card, or wire transfer.
    • Request personal or financial information by email, texts, or social media.
    • Threaten to immediately have you arrested or deported for not paying.

    In the new scam, the fake CP2000 notices often arrive as an attachment to an email — a red-flag — or by U.S. mail. Other telltale signs of this fraud:

    • There may be a “payment” link within the email. Scam emails can link you to sites that steal your personal information, take your money, or infect your computer with malware. Don’t click on the link.
    • The notices request that a check be made out to “I.R.S.” Real CP2000s ask taxpayers to make their checks out to “United States Treasury” if they agree they owe taxes.

    In the version we saw, a payment voucher refers to letter number LTR0105C, and requests that checks be sent to the “Austin Processing Center” in Texas. But scammers are crafty. They could send messages with a variety of return addresses.

    You can see an image of a real CP2000 notice on the IRS web page, Understanding Your CP2000 Notice. If you get a scam IRS notice, forward it to phishing@irs.gov and then delete it from your email account. Let the FTC know too.

    IRS Imposter Scams
    How to spot scammers who pretend to be IRS officials to get you to send them money.
    Tagged with: Affordable Care ActimposterIRSscam
    Blog Topics: 
    Money & Credit

    Sunday, November 27, 2016

    China Warns That U.S. Naval Patrols Threaten Sovereignty

    china ship
    The guide-missile frigates Bengbu (L), Zhuzhou (C) and Sanmenxia (R) steam in formation during a realistic training exercise. Three Type 056 frigates assigned to a maritime garrison command with the East China Sea Fleet of the PLA Navy conducted a 5-day training exercise in the sea area off the east coast of Zhejiang Province in late March, 2016. The training subjects include chaff rounds launching, visit, board, search and seizure (VBSS), live-fire shooting at night and so forth. Via xinhua
    (Bloomberg) American military vessels and aircraft carried out more than 700 patrols in the South China Sea region during 2015, making China the U.S.'s No. 1 surveillance target, according to a report by China's only state-backed institution dedicated to research of the waters.

    The patrols pose a threat to China's sovereignty and security interests, said the report by the National Institute for South China Sea Studies, which is headquartered in Hainan island. The document, the first of its kind released by China, warned that continued targeted operations by U.S. patrols would lead to militarization of the waters.

    Asia's Cauldron: The South China Sea and the End of a Stable Pacific by Robert D. Kaplan
    Related Book: Asia's Cauldron: The South China Sea and the End of a Stable Pacific by Robert D. Kaplan
    "China could possibly set up an Air Defense Identification Zone in the South China Sea if the U.S. continues to intensify patrols and low-altitude spying in the region," Wu Shicun, president of the think tank, told reporters in Beijing.

    Tensions in the region have risen after China built a web of artificial islands with runways and lighthouses on reefs that it claims are its sovereign territory. Donald Trump, who is preparing to take over the U.S. presidency in January, has accused Beijing of building a military fortress on reefs, saying in March that China's leaders "do that at will because they have no respect for our president and they have no respect for our country."

    "It's very possible for President-elect Donald Trump to deploy more vessels in the South China Sea," Wu said, adding that there's only a "very small chance" of military conflict in the region.

    'Obviously Target at China'

    A spokesman for the Pacific Fleet in Honolulu was unable to immediately comment on the report.

    The document, titled "Report on the Military of the United States of America in the Asia-Pacific Region," also said that Japan "provides strong support to the U.S. in the South China Sea." Japan has clashed with China over disputed territory in the East China Sea.

    Maritime drills carried out by the U.S., Japan and Australia were "obviously targeted at China," the report said. The three countries carried out their first drills in July 2015 at various locations around Australia and another in April in the Java Sea.

    The proposed deployment of the U.S. missile system known as the Terminal High-Altitude Area Defense in South Korea will directly undermine the strategic security interests of China and the region, the report said.

    "With the Obama administration advancing its strategic pivot and rebalancing toward the Asia Pacific, increased military spending, strengthened alliances and partnerships, and expanded scope of military activity are attestations of the apparent expansion and fast track bolstering of American military presence in the region," the report said.

    'Energetic' Activity

    "This is especially so in the adjacent areas of the South China Sea, where U.S. military activity has never been more energetic," it said.

    China's claims to more than 80 percent of the South China Sea, an international waterway that hosts more than $5 trillion of trade a year, clash with five others including Vietnam and the Philippines. China's claims were rejected by an international court in July, which found they had no legal basis. Beijing has ignored the ruling.

    The U.S. carries out so-called "freedom of navigation" operations by sending Navy ships and aircraft near disputed waters to demonstrate the right to fly and sail through what it considers to be international waters and airspace.

    — With assistance by Keith Zhai, and David Tweed

    ©2016 Bloomberg News



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    Do You Love Your Ship More Than Your Wife? YES Said Gibbs (Book Review)

    USS United States
    Maiden arrival of United States in New York, June 23, 1952 via The Frank O. Braynard Collection

    A Man And His Ship Book ReviewWhen a reporter asked William Francis Gibbs if he loved his favorite ship more than his wife his answer was surprising both in its honesty and in the fact most didn't doubt that the statement was true. Gibbs answered, "Yes, you are 1000% percent correct!"

    While working in an industry plagued with high divorce rates, Gibbs is not the first mariner to think, or even say, these words, yet little did he know how those words, his marriage, and the story behind one of the world's most magnificent ships would be so closely tied.

    Gibbs is a monumental figure in America's maritime history first proving his talent in the conversion of a World War I German liner into the SS Leviathan, the pride of America's merchant fleet.  When the next big war erupted, he focused his talent on developing a revolutionary process to construct the mighty Liberty Ships.

    Despite his intense efforts building the low-cost, quick-to-build, Liberty Ships, Gibbs never gave up the dream of building the greatest ship of all time, a mighty $78 million sibling of his great Leviathan.

    And he succeeded.

    In March 1952, alongside a long overhanging dock – there sat a ship like no other the world had ever seen. It was a type of merchant vessel known as luxury liners or speed queens as they were once called.  She was not the largest passenger vessel that had ever been built, and reporters at the time were not convinced she would be even the fastest.

    The ship was, in fact, what a 1952 New York Times article called, "The most significant piece of merchant marine construction America has put forward in several generations, maybe since the magnificent clippers."

    The ship was the SS United States.  The day she was launched from Newport News shipyard, the Times reported:

    There is a very American cut to her in the springing jut of her prow and in the easy modernity of the furnishings. There is great mass in her lines, but no bulkiness. From the outside she seems far too big an object to move at all much less at better than thirty knots but deep inside is a seething power plant that will handle that speed with ease.

    It is in many ways a ship to pop the eyeballs. The things that are public knowledge are arresting enough, the things that are military secrets are undoubtedly more so. New techniques, new ideas have gone into it. Standards beyond any before set were established and, despite anyone's tears of protest, adamantly adhered to.

    Thousands gathered for her launch but no-one looked upon her with greater admiration and pride than the eyes of her builder, the then 65-year-old naval architect William Francis Gibbs.

    To the crowd and most of the nation, Gibbs was stood alongside the vessel at the apex of celebrity and respect. They were even more impressed after the ship set sail and destroyed the speed record by crossing the Atlantic in a record three-days and 10-hours.

    Despite the impressive feat, America's attention is infamously short and in a few years later she would sail the North Atlantic in relative obscurity, her great speed having been surpassed by the jet airplanes that began to fly overhead.

    The new book "A Man and His Ship" brilliantly describes the impressive ship in such detail that even the most secluded landlubbers will be awed by both the ship and the brilliant individual who, seemingly, could accomplish anything. The book takes us from Gibb's early days as a child who traded comic books for technical drawings and engineering manuals through his determination to navigate his plans for the United States through political, business, and personal assaults.

    While the book concentrates on the person more than the ship itself, it's packed with the juicy details any mariner would love. In short Ujifusa's work is a love letter the SS united States and, as such, to the sea, merchant marine and the preservation of great vessels.

     Visit gCaptain's SS United States page to learn more about this historic vessel.



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