Thursday, May 4, 2017

Col. William S. Daniles, USMC (ret), CO, Lima Company, 3rd Bn, 3rd Marines, 3rd Marine Division - Okinawa


 (Col Daniels Far Left), Camp Schwab to Northern Training Area - Force March - 1961-1962

Col. Martin J. "Stormy" Sexton, USMC (ret), CO, 3rd Bn, 3rd Marines, 3rd Marine Division, - 1961 - 1962

  

Col. Martin J. "Stormy" Sexton, USMC (ret), CO, 3rd Bn, 3rd Marines, 3rd Marine Division, - 1961 - 1962 

Col. "Stormy" Sexton's, 3rd Bn, 3rd Marines, 3rd Marine Division - Okinawa 1961-1962 - Jungle Training NTA

     Stormy's 3rd Bn 3rd Marines 3rd Marine Division Field Shower, NTA Northern Training Are  Camoflague Weapons Plt, Lima 3/3 

Pirate Attacks on the Rise in West Africa

Oceans Beyond Piracy map showing attacks in West Africa waters.

By Joe Bavier ABIDJAN, May 2 (Reuters) – Armed attacks on ships in West African waters nearly doubled in 2016, with pirates increasingly focused on kidnapping their crew for ransom off Nigeria's coast, a report said on Tuesday.

A recent spate of attacks off Somalia, meanwhile, may also indicate a resurgence of piracy in the Western Indian Ocean as a result of less vigilance, the Oceans Beyond Piracy (OBP) project said.

OBP, a project of the privately funded One Earth Future Foundation that encourages cooperation across the international maritime community to tackle piracy, recorded 95 attacks in West Africa's Gulf of Guinea in 2016, up from 54 the previous year.

Cargo theft, once the main focus of piracy in the region, has given way to an increase in kidnappings, with 96 crew members taken hostage compared to 44 in 2015.

OBP estimated the total economic cost of maritime crime in West Africa at nearly $794 million.

"One of the reasons we are observing increased incidents of kidnap for ransom is that the model offers financial gain with less risk to the perpetrators than hijacking for cargo theft," said Maisie Pigeon, one of the authors of the OBP report.

Only one successful hijacking – the product tanker Maximus, which was attacked in February off Abidjan, Ivory Coast and then sailed to Nigeria – was recorded in West Africa by OBP in 2016.

"Nigeria … experienced a spike in attacks, including 18 kidnap for ransom attacks between March and May," it said. "Analysts suggest that this pattern is closely linked to militant attacks against the oil and gas infrastructure in the Niger Delta."

PIRATE NETWORKS

West Africa has emerged as the world's epicenter for piracy in recent years after increased patrolling by international navies and ramped up on-board security largely succeeded in suppressing hijackings off the Horn of Africa.

However, those efforts are expensive. OBP estimated the total cost of counter-piracy operations in the western Indian Ocean at $1.7 billion last year.

As Somali piracy has ebbed, navies have redeployed elsewhere and shipping companies cut back on private security, with a 12.5 percent decline in the number of vessels using armed guards through 2016, with 31.5 percent employing them by December.

But armed attacks beginning late last year, including the first successful hijackings since 2015, are a reminder that the region remains vulnerable, the report said.

"Pirate networks in Somalia still possess the intent and capability to commit acts of piracy," it said. (Editing by Alexander Smith)

(c) Copyright Thomson Reuters 2017.



Original Page: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Gcaptain/~3/Hr2ZXlQ0BmQ/



Sent from my iPad

GAO-17-306, Nuclear Waste: Opportunities Exist to Reduce Risks and Costs by Evaluating Different Waste Treatment Approaches at Hanford, May 03, 2017

What GAO Found

The Department of Energy (DOE) chose different approaches to treat the less radioactive portion of its nuclear weapons waste stored in tanks (tank waste)—which DOE refers to as "low-activity waste" (LAW)—at its two main cleanup sites, primarily in response to input from the two states. At the Savannah River Site, DOE and South Carolina agreed to use an existing facility to grout the site's LAW, a method that DOE determined could treat the waste faster and therefore address risks posed by prolonged storage of liquid waste in tanks sooner. Grout immobilizes waste in a concrete-like mixture. At Hanford, DOE is required by an agreement with the state and the Environmental Protection Agency to treat at least one-third to one-half of the site's LAW with a process called vitrification, which immobilizes the waste in glass. DOE chose vitrification in the 1990s with input from Washington state because studies at that time indicated that vitrification would be the most effective treatment approach for the conditions at Hanford. However, DOE has not yet determined how it will treat the remaining one-half to two-thirds of Hanford's LAW, known as "supplemental LAW," a decision it has proposed making by 2018. Congress passed legislation in 2004 that clarified DOE's authority to manage the LAW at the Savannah River Site as low-level waste. Clarifying DOE's authority at Hanford, in a manner that does not impair the regulatory authorities of Washington state, to determine whether some portions of the supplemental LAW can be managed as low-level waste, could enhance DOE's ability to make risk-based decisions for supplemental LAW.

At the Savannah River Site, DOE has grouted about 4 million gallons of LAW and has effectively addressed minor technical challenges, but at Hanford DOE has not yet treated any LAW and faces significant unresolved technical challenges. In addition, the best available information indicates that DOE's estimated costs to grout LAW at the Savannah River Site are substantially lower than its estimated costs to vitrify LAW at Hanford, and its schedule for completing LAW treatment at the Savannah River Site is decades shorter than its schedule at Hanford.

According to the 21 experts that attended GAO's meeting convened by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (National Academies), both vitrification and grout could effectively treat Hanford's LAW. These experts stated that current information shows that grout will perform better than was assumed when DOE made its decision to vitrify Hanford's LAW. According to some of the experts, using grout for supplemental LAW could help DOE complete its treatment mission sooner, reducing the environmental risks of leaving waste in tanks for long periods. Experts at GAO's meeting stated that developing updated information on the performance of treating Hanford's supplemental LAW with other methods, such as grout, may enable DOE to consider waste treatment approaches that accelerate DOE's tank waste treatment mission, thereby potentially reducing certain risks and lifecycle treatment costs. However, DOE has not developed current information on the performance of treating LAW with grout, or alternate methods, at Hanford, which is inconsistent with guidance developed by the National Research Council.

Why GAO Did This Study

DOE oversees the treatment and disposal of about 90 million gallons of radioactive waste from the nation's nuclear weapons program. Most of this waste is stored in tanks at DOE sites in Hanford, Washington, and Savannah River, South Carolina. The less radioactive portion of the tank waste, called LAW, comprises more than 90 percent of the waste's volume but less than 10 percent of the total radioactivity. DOE has chosen different approaches for treating LAW at the two sites, but it has not made a final decision on how to treat Hanford's supplemental LAW.

GAO examined (1) DOE's reasons for choosing its treatment approaches for LAW at the Savannah River and Hanford Sites, (2) the status of DOE's treatment of LAW at these sites, and (3) experts' views on the likely performance of approaches for treating Hanford's LAW. GAO reviewed technical reports on DOE's waste treatment strategies at the two sites, interviewed DOE officials at headquarters and the sites, and convened an experts' meeting through the National Academies to discuss the effectiveness and risks of vitrification and grout.

What GAO Recommends

Congress should consider specifically authorizing DOE to classify Hanford's supplemental LAW based on risk, consistent with existing regulatory authorities. GAO also recommends that DOE develop updated information on the performance of treating LAW with alternate methods, such as grout, before it selects an approach for treating supplemental LAW. DOE agreed with both recommendations.

For more information, contact David C. Trimble at (202) 512-3841 or trimbled@gao.gov or Timothy M. Persons at (202) 512-6412 or personst@gao.gov.



Original Page: http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-17-306?source=ra



Sent from my iPad

GAO-17-599T, Border Security: Progress and Challenges in DHS's Efforts to Address High-Risk Travelers and Strengthen Visa Security, May 03, 2017

What GAO Found

In January 2017, GAO reported that the Department of Homeland Security's (DHS) U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) operates predeparture programs to help identify and interdict high-risk travelers before they board U.S.-bound flights. CBP officers inspect all U.S.-bound travelers on precleared flights at the 15 Preclearance locations and, if deemed inadmissible, a traveler will not be permitted to board the aircraft. CBP also operates nine Immigration Advisory Program and two Joint Security Program locations, as well as three Regional Carrier Liaison Groups, through which CBP may recommend that air carriers not permit identified high-risk travelers to board U.S.-bound flights. CBP data showed that it identified and interdicted over 22,000 high-risk air travelers through these programs in fiscal year 2015 (the most recent data available at the time of GAO's report). However, CBP had not fully evaluated the overall effectiveness of these programs using performance measures and baselines. CBP tracked some data, such as the number of travelers deemed inadmissible, but had not set baselines to determine if predeparture programs are achieving goals, consistent with best practices for performance measurement. GAO recommended that CBP develop and implement a system of performance measures and baselines to better position CBP to assess if the programs are achieving their goals. CBP concurred and has established a working group to develop such measures and baselines.

In March 2011, GAO reported on the Visa Security Program (VSP) through which DHS's U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) deploys personnel to certain U.S. overseas posts to review visa applications. Among other things, GAO found that ICE did not collect comprehensive data on all VSP performance measures or track the time officials spent on visa security activities. DHS did not concur with GAO's recommendations to address these limitations, stating that ICE collected data on all the required performance measures and tracked VSP case investigation hours. However, GAO continues to believe DHS needs to address these limitations. GAO has ongoing work assessing U.S. agencies' efforts to strengthen the security of the visa process, including oversight of VSP, in which GAO plans to follow up on the findings and recommendations from its March 2011 report related to ICE's efforts to enhance VSP performance measurement.

In May 2016, GAO reported on DHS's oversight of the Visa Waiver Program (VWP), which allows nationals from 38 countries to travel visa-free to the United States for business or pleasure for 90 days or less. GAO reported, among other things, that all 38 countries entered into required agreements, or their equivalents, to (1) report lost and stolen passports, (2) share identity information about known or suspected terrorists, and (3) share criminal history information. However, not all countries shared such information. In August 2015, DHS established a new requirement for VWP countries to implement the latter two agreements; however, DHS did not establish time frames for instituting the amended requirements. GAO recommended that DHS work with VWP countries to implement these agreements and DHS concurred. As of April 2017, DHS reported that officials are continuing to work with VWP countries on time frames for implementing program requirements.

Why GAO Did This Study

DHS seeks to identify and interdict travelers who are potential security threats to the United States, such as foreign fighters and potential terrorists, human traffickers, drug smugglers and otherwise inadmissible persons, at the earliest possible point in time. DHS also adjudicates petitions for certain visa categories and has certain responsibilities for strengthening the security of the visa process, including oversight of VSP and VWP. State manages the visa adjudication process for foreign nationals seeking admission to the United States.

This statement addresses (1) CBP programs aimed at preventing high-risk travelers from boarding U.S.-bound flights; (2) ICE's management of VSP; and (3) DHS's oversight of VWP. This statement is based on prior products GAO issued from March 2011 through January 2017, along with selected updates conducted in April 2017 to obtain information from DHS on actions it has taken to address prior GAO recommendations.

What GAO Recommends

GAO previously made recommendations to improve evaluation of CBP's predeparture programs' performance and strengthen DHS's oversight of VSP and VWP. DHS agreed with GAO's recommendations related to CBP's predeparture programs and VWP. DHS did not agree with some of GAO's recommendations related to VSP. GAO has ongoing work related to, among other things, DHS's management and oversight of VSP and plans to report later this year on the results of this work.

For more information, contact Rebecca Gambler at (202) 512-8777 or gamblerr@gao.gov.



Original Page: http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-17-599T?source=ra



Sent from my iPad

Okinawa International Karate Tournament to be held in August 2018, hosting up to 6,000 participants from other prefectures and abroad

Okinawa International Karate Tournament to be held in August 2018, hosting up to 6,000 participants from other prefectures and abroad

Vice Governor Moritake Tomikawa made a speech at the International Karate Tournament Executive Committee's general meeting on April 19, at the ANA Crowne Plaza Hotel Okinawa Harbor View in Naha City.


April 19, 2017 Ryukyu Shimpo

The Okinawa International Karate Tournament executive committee, which plans to host the 1st Okinawa International Karate Tournament in August 2018, held its second general meeting in Naha City on April 19.
The tournament will be held in kata category's four divisions, Shuri-te/Tomari-te stye, Naha-te style, Uechi-ryu and Kobudou.

At the meeting, the tournament logo, posters, flyers and other matters were reported from subcommittees. A website for the tournament containing information about venues was set up at the end of March.

The executive committee will send caravans to European countries and elsewhere to promote the tournament from October this year to January next year.

It expects 5 to 6,000 participants from other prefectures and overseas to take part in events including seminars and exchange meetings.

(English translation by T&CT)

Go to Japanese

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on Twitter

Previous Article:Okinawa Convention and Visitors Bureau introduces new mascot to boost Okinawa tourism


Next Article:Project Restores Ryukyu Kingdom-Era Art and Techniques using Modern Science

[Similar Articles]




Original Page: http://english.ryukyushimpo.jp/2017/04/26/26868/



Sent from my iPad

Healthcare Inspection – Community Nursing Home Program Safety Concerns, VA Northern California Healthcare System, Mather, California

At the request of Congressman John Garamendi, OIG conducted a healthcare inspection to assess allegations concerning patient safety in the Community Nursing Home (CNH) Program at the VA Northern California Health Care System (facility), Mather, CA. We substantiated that a patient was admitted to a locked CNH Alzheimer care center and told the complainant that he was being held against his will. However, we determined the patient’s placement was appropriate because a facility psychiatrist deemed the patient lacked decision-making capacity regarding his living situation and had demonstrated an inability to safely and independently live in the community. We also substantiated a delay in the patient receiving hearing aids with mitigating circumstances. We did not substantiate that a patient was given opioid medications against his wishes or that he was denied physical therapy. However, we identified a delay in the patient obtaining prosthesis care and confusion about the provision of his mental health care. We concluded that communication and collaboration between facility and CNH staff needed improvement. We did not substantiate that facility staff did not report an alleged financial abuse to Adult Protective Services; however the reporting was not completed timely. We substantiated Non-VA Care Coordination (NVCC) consult authorization delays for services. For the reviewed consults, the approval was timely; however, on average, NVCC staff took an additional 24 days before faxing the authorization approval to the CNH. We determined that program staff needed to monitor the NVCC process and that NVCC staff needed to timely fax authorizations to the CNH. We did not substantiate facility consult service delays. CNH patients generally received the requested services within 30 days. We substantiated that program registered nurses or social workers did not consistently comply with the required monthly or quarterly patient visits in CNH facilities. We determined that regular visits would have provided program staff opportunities to identify and resolve CNH patient-specific issues. We recommended that the Facility Director ensure (1) coordination of MH appointments between facility and CNH providers, (2) timely reporting of suspected elder abuse; (3) timely delivery of authorizations for consulted services to contracted CNH staff and coordination of NVCC appointments for CNH patients, and (4) visits by program registered nurses and social workers to CNHs are conducted as required.




Powered by GovDelivery

Criminal and Civil Enforcement | Fraud | Office of Inspector General | U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Checkout the below link to see how many, Medicare, Tricare and VA Contractors are charged in a 6-month period.  Notice how some give false diagnosis to increase their income! 
Every have your SSN stolen? Every have your identity stolen?  Ever have someone at the medical office asking for your SSN on the 1st call?  



Sent from my iPad

Administrator of Miami-Area Home Health Agency Sentenced to 126 Months in Prison for Involvement in $2.5 Million Medicare Fraud Scheme

Administrator of Miami-Area Home Health Agency Sentenced to 126 Months in Prison for Involvement in $2.5 Million Medicare Fraud Scheme

Today, the administrator of a Miami-area home health agency was sentenced to a 126 month prison term for his role in a $2.5 million Medicare fraud scheme. 

Acting Assistant Attorney General Kenneth A. Blanco of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division, U.S. Attorney Wifredo A. Ferrer of the Southern District of Florida, Special Agent in Charge George L. Piro of the FBI’s Miami Division and Special Agent in Charge Shimon Richmond of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General’s (HHS-OIG) Miami Regional Office made the announcement.

Raciel Leon, 42, of Miami, was sentenced by U.S. District Judge William J. Zloch of the Southern District of Florida.  In December 2016, he was convicted after a two-week jury trial of one count of conspiracy to commit health care fraud and wire fraud and one count of conspiracy to defraud the United States and pay and receive health care bribes and kickbacks. 

According to evidence presented at trial, Leon was the manager of Mercy Home Care Inc.  (Mercy) and a billing employee for D&D&D Home Health Care Inc. (DDD), both of which were home health agencies in Miami-Dade County, Florida.  The evidence showed that Leon and his co-conspirators used the companies to submit false claims to Medicare that were based on services that were not medically necessary, not actually provided, and for patients that were procured through the payment of illegal kickbacks to doctors and patient recruiters.   According to evidence presented at trial, Leon submitted claims to Medicare for beneficiaries who were admitted to Mercy and DDD only as a result of forged prescriptions and falsified medical documentation; backdated claims for services supposedly rendered years prior; and claims for beneficiaries who were coached to say they needed services, when in fact they were not homebound.  Leon also destroyed evidence, including a kickback ledger, prior to his arrest. 

The evidence introduced at trial further established that between Oct. 2014 and June 2015, Medicare paid approximately $2.5 million for false and fraudulent claims submitted by Mercy and DDD. 

Ten of Leon’s co-conspirators previously pleaded guilty or were convicted at trial in this and other related cases filed in the Southern District of Florida.  

The case was investigated by the FBI and the HHS-OIG and was brought as part of the Medicare Fraud Strike Force, under the supervision of the Criminal Division’s Fraud Section and the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of Florida.  Trial Attorneys Lisa Miller and Angela Adams of the Criminal Division’s Fraud Section are prosecuting the case.

Tampa Man Pleads Guilty To Paying Health Care Kickbacks - Tricare Ripoff's

Tampa Man Pleads Guilty To Paying Health Care Kickbacks

Tampa, FL – United States Attorney A. Lee Bentley, III announces that Anthonio Miller (26, Tampa) today pleaded guilty to conspiracy to pay kickbacks in connection with a federal health care benefit program. He faces a maximum penalty of five years in federal prison.

 

According to the plea agreement, Miller was an active duty petty officer with the U.S. Navy stationed at MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa. Beginning in October 2014, he became a sales representative for Centurion Compounding Inc., Centurion, a marketing firm located in Wesley Chapel, utilized sales representatives as independent contractors to market compounded medications, specifically creams for pain and scars, to health care benefit program beneficiaries. Centurion focused its promotional efforts on TRICARE beneficiaries based upon an understanding and belief that TRICARE would pay claims for these compounded creams. 

 

Miller was initially recruited into the Centurion scheme by other active-duty military members, including his co-defendant Cordera Hill, to be a patient and to obtain compounded creams marketed by Centurion. On October 22, 2014, Miller received a prescription from a doctor for pain cream and scar cream. He went on to obtain additional prescriptions in his own name, for which TRICARE paid approximately $60,673.06. 

 

Miller agreed and conspired with other members of his Centurion sales marketing group, self-labeled “team cream,” to give and offer to give TRICARE beneficiaries incentives, such as cash, meals, entertainment, and travel expenses, to visit a doctor and obtain prescriptions for Centurion-marketed compounded creams for which Miller and other “team cream” members would receive commissions. Between October 2014 and February 2015, Miller caused approximately $655,611 in claims to be submitted to TRICARE, resulting in the payments of $558,090.04 for prescriptions, from which Centurion and Miller received commissions. Miller received commissions from Centurion totaling approximately $19,977.53 and, at the time Centurion was shut down in February 2015, Miller was owed an additional $34,999.25 in commissions from Centurion. 

 

This case was investigated by the Defense Criminal Investigative Service, the U.S. Air Force Office of Special Investigation, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Department of Health and Human Services – Office of Inspector General, and the Drug Enforcement Administration. It is being prosecuted by Assistant United States Attorneys Mandy Riedel and Megan Kistler.

ables Woman Sentenced For Skimming Social Security And Medicaid Benefits From Mentally Ill And Elderly Beneficiaries - Florida Weak Laws


Tampa, FL – U.S. District Judge Mary S. Scriven has sentenced Ilfrenise Charlemagne (68, Coral Gables) to 33 months in federal prison for wire fraud. She pleaded guilty on November 8, 2016.

 

According to court documents, starting in 2008, Charlemagne owned and operated Hilcrest Residential ALF, an assisted living facility in St. Petersburg for the aged and mentally ill. The majority of the funds used to operate Hilcrest came from the Medicaid and Social Security benefits of the residents. In May 2011, the Florida Agency for Health Care Administration (AHCA) forcibly closed Hilcrest after determining that the facility was heavily infested with bedbugs and roaches; that residents were found to be unkempt with evidence of confusion and disassociation; that residents were hungry and underfed; that Charlemagne failed to provide residents with a safe and sanitary living environment; and that residents were at risk of serious injury and major health problems. In October 2011, Charlemagne entered into a settlement agreement with AHCA promising not to own or operate an ALF for a period of five years. 

 

That same month, Charlemagne changed Hilcrest’s name to Pleasant Alternative and began the process of reopening. She applied to AHCA for a license to operate an ALF using the identity of a straw owner. In 2012, Charlemagne reopened the ALF at the same location and again began housing Medicaid and Social Security beneficiaries who were primarily mentally ill adults. By April 2013, AHCA again shut down the facility, finding that was no heat or air conditioning; that residents weren’t provided with adequate medication or food; that rodents, vermin, and debris were found throughout the facility; and that the facility posed a serious and immediate danger to the residents and the public. During her time operating the ALFs, Charlemagne diverted the more than $1 million in government benefits intended for the care and housing of her residents.  She used some of the monies for her own personal use, including cash withdrawals, credit card payments, car payments, and rent, among other things. 

 

This case was investigated by the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services - Office of Inspector General, the State of Florida Medicaid Fraud Control Unit, and the Social Security Administration - Office of the Inspector General. It was prosecuted by Assistant United States Attorneys Mandy Riedel and Megan Kistler.Tampa, FL – U.S. District Judge Mary S. Scriven has sentenced Ilfrenise Charlemagne (68, Coral Gables) to 33 months in federal prison for wire fraud. She pleaded guilty on November 8, 2016.

 

According to court documents, starting in 2008, Charlemagne owned and operated Hilcrest Residential ALF, an assisted living facility in St. Petersburg for the aged and mentally ill. The majority of the funds used to operate Hilcrest came from the Medicaid and Social Security benefits of the residents. In May 2011, the Florida Agency for Health Care Administration (AHCA) forcibly closed Hilcrest after determining that the facility was heavily infested with bedbugs and roaches; that residents were found to be unkempt with evidence of confusion and disassociation; that residents were hungry and underfed; that Charlemagne failed to provide residents with a safe and sanitary living environment; and that residents were at risk of serious injury and major health problems. In October 2011, Charlemagne entered into a settlement agreement with AHCA promising not to own or operate an ALF for a period of five years. 

 

That same month, Charlemagne changed Hilcrest’s name to Pleasant Alternative and began the process of reopening. She applied to AHCA for a license to operate an ALF using the identity of a straw owner. In 2012, Charlemagne reopened the ALF at the same location and again began housing Medicaid and Social Security beneficiaries who were primarily mentally ill adults. By April 2013, AHCA again shut down the facility, finding that was no heat or air conditioning; that residents weren’t provided with adequate medication or food; that rodents, vermin, and debris were found throughout the facility; and that the facility posed a serious and immediate danger to the residents and the public. During her time operating the ALFs, Charlemagne diverted the more than $1 million in government benefits intended for the care and housing of her residents.  She used some of the monies for her own personal use, including cash withdrawals, credit card payments, car payments, and rent, among other things. 

 

This case was investigated by the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services - Office of Inspector General, the State of Florida Medicaid Fraud Control Unit, and the Social Security Administration - Office of the Inspector General. It was prosecuted by Assistant United States Attorneys Mandy Riedel and Megan Kistler.

Adoption Counselor Convicted of Stealing Personal Information from Former Employer - Big Problem For Veterans

Adoption Counselor Convicted of Stealing Personal Information from Former Employer

BOSTON - A former employee of Tufts Health Plan was convicted yesterday by a federal jury in Boston of stealing the identifying information of over 3,000 Medicare customers.

 

Lynrolte Cezaire, 29, of Medford, was convicted following a seven-day jury trial of unlawfully disclosing Social Security numbers and aggravated identity theft. U.S. District Court Judge George A. O’Toole, Jr. scheduled sentencing for July 13, 2017. Cezaire currently works at Adoption Resource Associates.

 

From 2011 to 2014, Cezaire worked in the Medicare enrollment department at Tufts Health Plan in Watertown. During her employment, Cezaire helped a coworker, Emeline Lubin, photograph Cezaire’s computer screen while it displayed lists of Medicare customers’ names, dates of birth and Social Security numbers. Lubin then gave the information to Sniders Jean-Jacques, a Florida man, who, along with Lubin’s brother, Marvin Lubin, was involved in a scheme to use stolen identities to steal Social Security benefits and to file false tax returns to collect the refunds. 

 

In December 2014, Jean-Jacques was sentenced to two years in prison. In October 2014, Marvin Lubin was sentenced to one year and one day in prison.

 

The charge of aggravated identity theft provides for a mandatory sentence of two years in prison. The charge of unlawfully disclosing Social Security numbers provides for a sentence of no greater than five years in prison, three years of supervised release, and a fine of $250,000 or twice the gross gain or loss, whichever is greater. Actual sentences for federal crimes are typically less than the maximum penalties. Sentences are imposed by a federal district court judge based upon the U.S. Sentencing Guidelines and other statutory factors.

 

Acting United States Attorney William D. Weinreb; Scott Antolik, Special Agent in Charge of the Office of Inspector General, Social Security Administration, Office of Investigations – Boston Field Division; Phillip Coyne, Special Agent in Charge of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Inspector General; Joel P. Garland, Special Agent in Charge of the Internal Revenue Service’s Criminal Investigation in Boston; and Stephen A. Marks, Special Agent in Charge of the U.S. Secret Service, Boston Field Office, made the announcement. Assistance was also provided by the Suffolk County District Attorney’s Office. Special Assistant U.S. Attorney Timothy Landry and Assistant U.S. Attorney Robert Richardson of Weinreb’s Major Crimes Unit are prosecuting the case.

Owner of Independence Clinic Pleads Guilty to Health Care Fraud Scheme - Veterans

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday, April 20, 2017

Owner of Independence Clinic Pleads Guilty to Health Care Fraud Scheme

KANSAS CITY, Mo. – Tom Larson, Acting United States Attorney for the Western District of Missouri, announced that the owner of an Independence, Mo., medical clinic pleaded guilty in federal court today to his role in a fraud scheme that involved disability examinations of veterans and to making false statements regarding his role in the physical examinations of commercial truck drivers.

David L. Biersmith, 80, of Kansas City, waived his right to a grand jury and pleaded guilty before U.S. District Judge Howard F. Sachs to a federal information that charges him with one count of health care fraud and one count of making false statements to a federal agency.

Biersmith was the owner and president of Industrial Medical Center (IMC) in Independence. Although Biersmith had no medical license or other medical credentials, IMC was a drug- and DNA-testing center and had contracts with various entities to provide medical services to patients and to provide drug testing and physical examinations for drivers of commercial motor vehicles.

On April 23, 2013, Biersmith signed a contract with Logistics Health, Inc., to provide disability examinations for veterans to determine the extent of veterans’ impairments and eligibility for benefits. Initially those examinations were conducted by a licensed physician at IMC. When the physician left in July 2013, Biersmith directed Wayne W. Williamson, 74, of Kansas City, and another person to perform the examinations, although they were not authorized to do so under the contract with Logistics Health. Williamson was formerly a physician but lost his medical license due to an earlier fraud scheme and a narcotics distribution charge.

In a separate but related case, Williamson pleaded guilty on Jan. 17, 2017, to health care fraud. Williamson was a medical consultant at IMC during various periods beginning at least as early as 2013 through at least March 2015.

Williamson was formerly a medical doctor but voluntarily surrendered his medical license in 2010 after he pled guilty to health care fraud; conspiracy to distribute Oxycotin, Percocet, and Xanax; and harassing or attempting to harass an investigator with the Missouri State Board of Healing Arts. Williamson was sentenced to three years in federal prison and permanently excluded from participation in Medicare or Medicaid programs.

Williamson admitted that he performed disability examinations for the Department of Veterans Affairs under IMC’s contract with Logistics Health. This was done in violation of Logistic Health’s contract with the Department of Veterans Affairs, which required that disability examinations be conducted by credentialed providers and that the examiners must have a clear and unrestricted license and not be excluded from participation in the Medicare or Medicaid programs.

IMC falsely represented that a licensed physician had completed and electronically signed the Disability Benefits Questionnaires. IMC submitted invoices to Logistics Health to be paid for 209 disability examinations on 53 veterans. In turn, Logistics Health submitted invoices to the Department of Veterans Affairs for the disability examinations performed by its subcontractor, IMC. The Department of Veteran’s Affairs paid Logistics Health $39,155 for the disability examinations performed by its subcontractor, IMC.

In April 2014, Logistics Health contacted the Department of Veterans Affairs—Office of Inspector General hotline and reported the fraudulent activity. Because a credentialed provider did not conduct the disability examinations, the Department of Veterans Affairs had to re-adjudicate all those claims. Some veterans had to be physically re-examined, and others had their claim file reviewed.

In addition to the health care fraud, Biersmith admitted that he made materially false and fraudulent statements related to IMC’s drug testing and medical examinations on drivers of commercial motor vehicles. Those examinations are required by Department of Transportation regulations. In a signed affidavit provided to federal agents, Biersmith stated that he had only signed a “few” physicals and only before, during, or after an examination had been performed by a chiropractor. In fact, Biersmith admitted today, he signed at least 65 such documents using the chiropractor’s name, including instances when the chiropractor did not perform the exam.

Under federal statutes, Biersmith is subject to a sentence of up to 15 years in federal prison without parole. The maximum statutory sentence is prescribed by Congress and is provided here for informational purposes, as the sentencing of the defendant will be determined by the court based on the advisory sentencing guidelines and other statutory factors. A sentencing hearing will be scheduled after the completion of a presentence investigation by the United States Probation Office.

This case is being prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorneys Cindi S. Woolery and Gregg R. Coonrod. It was investigated by the Department of Veterans Affairs—Office of Inspector General, the Department of Transportation—Office of Inspector General, the Department of Labor—EBSA and the Department of Health and Human Services—Office of Inspector General.

Oxygen Equipment Provider Pays $11.4 Million to Resolve False Claims Act Allegations - More Tricare

Oxygen Equipment Provider Pays $11.4 Million to Resolve False Claims Act Allegations

The Department of Justice announced today that Braden Partners, L.P., doing business as Pacific Pulmonary Services, has agreed to pay $11.4 million to resolve allegations against it and its general partner, Teijin Pharma USA LLC, for violating the False Claims Act by submitting claims for reimbursement to Medicare and other federal healthcare programs for oxygen and related equipment supplied in violation of program rules, and for sleep therapy equipment supplied as part of a cross-referral kickback scheme with sleep clinics.

 

“This settlement demonstrates our continued pursuit of health care providers who take advantage of federal healthcare programs,” said Acting Assistant Attorney General Chad A. Readler of the Justice Department’s Civil Division. “We will investigate and take action against providers who cut corners and pay kickbacks.”

 

California-based Pacific Pulmonary Services furnishes stationary and portable oxygen tanks and related supplies, and sleep therapy equipment, such as Continuous Positive Airway Pressure, Bi-level Positive Airway Pressure masks and related supplies, to patients’ homes in California and other states. The government alleged that, beginning in about 2004, Pacific Pulmonary Services began submitting claims to the Medicare, TRICARE and Federal Employee Health Benefits programs for home oxygen and oxygen equipment without obtaining a physician authorization, as required by program rules. 

 

Beginning in 2006, certain of the company’s patient care coordinators also allegedly agreed to make patient referrals to sleep testing clinics in exchange for those clinics’ agreement to refer patients to Pacific Pulmonary Services for sleep therapy equipment. The government alleged that this conduct violated the Anti-Kickback Act, which prohibits offering, paying, soliciting or receiving remuneration to induce referrals of items or services covered by Medicare, Medicaid and/or other federally funded programs. 

 

“The U.S. Attorney’s Office is committed to taking all appropriate action against companies that disregard patients’ medical needs in pursuit of company profits,” said U.S. Attorney Brian J. Stretch for the Northern District of California. “Patients in federal health care programs expect and deserve medical care that is free from any undue influence and complies with the program safeguards that are in place to protect patients.”

 

“Home oxygen equipment and related supplies are some of the most fraudulently billed items of durable medical equipment,” said Special Agent in Charge Steven J. Ryan of the Office of Inspector General for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. “Medicare suppliers more concerned with profits than compliance will be met with investigation and enforcement.”

 

This settlement resolves allegations filed in a lawsuit by a former sales representative of Pacific Pulmonary Services, in federal court in San Francisco, California. The lawsuit was filed by Manuel Alcaine under the qui tam, or whistleblower, provisions of the False Claims Act, which permit private individuals to sue on behalf of the government for false claims and to share in any recovery. The Act also allows the government to intervene and take over the action, as it did in this case. Mr. Alcaine will receive $1.824 million of the recovered funds.

 

The settlement was the result of a coordinated effort by the U.S. Attorney’s Office of the Northern District of California, the Civil Division’s Commercial Litigation Branch, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General, and the various other agencies that administer the federal health care plans at issue. 

 

The case is captioned United States ex rel. Alcaine v. Braden Partners, L.P., dba Pacific Pulmonary Services, et al., Case No. 10-cv-4597 (N.D. Cal.). The claims resolved by the settlements are allegations only; there has been no determination of liability.

Pharmacist Pleads Guilty To Conspiracy To Pay Healthcare Kickbacks - Tricare

Pharmacist Pleads Guilty To Conspiracy To Pay Healthcare Kickbacks

Tampa, FL – Acting United States Attorney W. Stephen Muldrow announces that Benjamin Nundy (39, Ruskin) today pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit healthcare fraud. He faces a maximum penalty of five years in federal prison.

 

According to court documents, Nundy was a licensed pharmacist who co-owned Lifecare Pharmacy in Pinellas County with his business partner, Carlos Mazariegos. In 2014, Nundy, Mazariegos, and Dr. Anthony Baldizzi, a licensed physician, agreed that Lifecare would pay Baldizzi illegal kickbacks for prescriptions of compounded medications written by Baldizzi and filled at Lifecare. In May 2014, Mazariegos, acting on behalf of Lifecare, entered into a marketing agreement with Centurion Compounding Inc., a marketing firm in Pasco County that employed sales representatives to market compounded creams for pain and scars to beneficiaries of healthcare plans, especially TRICARE. These compounded creams typically ranged in price from $900 to $21,000 for a one-month supply. 

 

Between May and November 2014, Centurion directed patients that it had recruited and the physicians within its network to send all of their compounded cream prescriptions to Centurion. Centurion then transmitted these prescriptions to Lifecare to be filled. Mazariegos, Nundy, and the principals of Centurion agreed to pay illegal kickbacks to Baldizzi equal to approximately 10% of the after-cost amount of each claim paid by TRICARE and other healthcare benefit programs as a result of compounded medication prescriptions written by Baldizzi and filled by Lifecare, for Centurion-recruited patients. For example, in December 2014, Mazariegos wrote a check to a car dealership for $71,900, funded with the proceeds from the operation of Lifecare, to pay for a BMW for Baldizzi in partial satisfaction of kickbacks that Lifecare and Centurion owed to him.

 

Lifecare received approximately $5.3 million from TRICARE for claims made for compounded medications prescribed by Baldizzi resulting from this illegal kickback relationship. Mazariegos and Nundy also billed Medicare $1,064,729 for compounded medications that Lifecare made with bulk powder ingredients when they knew that Medicare only reimbursed for such medications when they were made using crushed tablets. 

 

Carlos Mazariegos pleaded guilty to engaging in a conspiracy to commit healthcare fraud on April 10, 2017.

 

A grand jury returned an indictment charging Baldizzi with conspiracy, receiving healthcare kickbacks, and engaging in illegal monetary transactions. The case is currently set for trial in January 2018.

 

This case was investigated by the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services - Office of Inspector General, the Defense Criminal Investigative Service, the U.S. Air Force Office of Special Investigation, and the Drug Enforcement Administration. It is being prosecuted by Assistant United States Attorneys Mandy Riedel and Megan Kistler.

South Florida Doctor Convicted of Sixty-Seven Criminal Counts Related to Medicare Fraud Scheme

South Florida Doctor Convicted of Sixty-Seven Criminal Counts Related to Medicare Fraud Scheme 

Today, a federal jury in South Florida convicted Dr. Salomon Melgen of sixty-seven criminal counts related to his participation in a health care fraud scheme involving the filing of false claims and the inclusion of false entries into patients’ medical charts.

Benjamin Greenberg, Acting United States Attorney for the Southern District of Florida, George L. Piro, Special Agent in Charge, Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Miami Field Office, Shimon Richmond, Special Agent in Charge, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Inspector General (HHS-OIG), John F. Khin, Special Agent in Charge, Defense Criminal Investigative Service (DCIS), and Patrick Fletcher, Special Agent in Charge, United States Railroad Retirement Board, Office of Inspector General (RRB-OIG), made the announcement.

Dr. Melgen is scheduled to be sentenced on July 14, 2017, before U.S. District Court Judge Kenneth A. Marra, in West Palm Beach, Florida. The defendant faces a maximum sentence of 10 years’ imprisonment for each of the thirty-seven health care fraud counts and 5 years’ imprisonment for each of the thirty false claims and false entry counts of conviction.

Dr. Meglen, an ophthalmologist and retina specialist who had practiced in Palm Beach and St. Lucie Counties with “Vitreo Retinal Consultants” and “The Melgen Retina Eye Center,” engaged in a scheme to defraud the Medicare program and other health care benefit programs, by, among other things, falsely diagnosing Medicare patients with macular degeneration and then performing and billing for medically unnecessary tests and procedures. As a result of these unnecessary practices the defendant received more than $90 million from the Medicare program, alone, during the six year period between January 2008 through December 2013. Melgen’s medical practice was closed following his arrest in April 2015.

“For years, Dr. Melgen knowingly made false diagnoses and submitted fraudulent bills in order to illegally line his pockets with millions of dollars intended for the legitimate diagnosis and treatment of Medicare patients,” stated Acting U.S. Attorney Benjamin G. Greenberg. “Today’s 67 count guilty verdict speaks volumes about the extent of this fraud. Dr. Melgen will now be held accountable for perpetuating a massive fraud scheme that caused millions of dollars in losses. The U.S. Attorney’s Office reminds the community that those who commit fraud, regardless of their professional position in South Florida, will be called to answer for their crimes.”

"Dr. Salomon E. Melgen, guilty on 67 counts of health care fraud, can no longer bilk Medicare out of millions of dollars," said George L. Piro, Special Agent in Charge, FBI Miami. "No matter what the scheme or how elaborately it is disguised, the FBI and our law enforcement partners will investigate and criminally prosecute such fraud to the fullest extent of the law."

“Physicians who exploit Medicare patients through intentional misdiagnosis and medically unnecessary services just to boost their own profits have no place in our health care system,” said Special Agent in Charge Shimon R. Richmond of HHS Office of Inspector General. “Our agents will continue to pursue corrupt health professionals to protect patients and U.S. taxpayers.”

"Corrupt health care providers who defraud Federal health care systems divert precious tax dollars from where they are needed most," stated Special Agent in Charge John F. Khin, Southeast Field Office, DCIS. "The DCIS is committed, in joint investigations with our law enforcement partners, to bring those to justice who undermine the integrity of DoD's TRICARE program intended to serve military members and their families."

“Individuals that commit fraud against U.S. Government programs will continue to be investigated and prosecuted by us and our law enforcement partners,” said Patrick Fletcher, Special Agent in Charge, Office of Inspector General, Office of Investigations, for the U.S. RRB.

Mr. Greenberg commended the investigative efforts of the FBI, HHS-OIG, DCIS and RRB-OIG. This case is being prosecuted by Assistant United States Attorneys Roger H. Stefin, Carolyn Bell, and Alexandra Chase of the West Palm Beach Office.

Related court documents and information may be found on the website of the United States District Court for the Southern District of Florida at www.flsd.uscourts.gov or on http://pacer.flsd.uscourts.gov.

Today, a federal jury in South Florida convicted Dr. Salomon Melgen of sixty-seven criminal counts related to his participation in a health care fraud scheme involving the filing of false claims and the inclusion of false entries into patients’ medical charts.

Benjamin Greenberg, Acting United States Attorney for the Southern District of Florida, George L. Piro, Special Agent in Charge, Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Miami Field Office, Shimon Richmond, Special Agent in Charge, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Inspector General (HHS-OIG), John F. Khin, Special Agent in Charge, Defense Criminal Investigative Service (DCIS), and Patrick Fletcher, Special Agent in Charge, United States Railroad Retirement Board, Office of Inspector General (RRB-OIG), made the announcement.

Dr. Melgen is scheduled to be sentenced on July 14, 2017, before U.S. District Court Judge Kenneth A. Marra, in West Palm Beach, Florida. The defendant faces a maximum sentence of 10 years’ imprisonment for each of the thirty-seven health care fraud counts and 5 years’ imprisonment for each of the thirty false claims and false entry counts of conviction.

Dr. Meglen, an ophthalmologist and retina specialist who had practiced in Palm Beach and St. Lucie Counties with “Vitreo Retinal Consultants” and “The Melgen Retina Eye Center,” engaged in a scheme to defraud the Medicare program and other health care benefit programs, by, among other things, falsely diagnosing Medicare patients with macular degeneration and then performing and billing for medically unnecessary tests and procedures. As a result of these unnecessary practices the defendant received more than $90 million from the Medicare program, alone, during the six year period between January 2008 through December 2013. Melgen’s medical practice was closed following his arrest in April 2015.

“For years, Dr. Melgen knowingly made false diagnoses and submitted fraudulent bills in order to illegally line his pockets with millions of dollars intended for the legitimate diagnosis and treatment of Medicare patients,” stated Acting U.S. Attorney Benjamin G. Greenberg. “Today’s 67 count guilty verdict speaks volumes about the extent of this fraud. Dr. Melgen will now be held accountable for perpetuating a massive fraud scheme that caused millions of dollars in losses. The U.S. Attorney’s Office reminds the community that those who commit fraud, regardless of their professional position in South Florida, will be called to answer for their crimes.”

"Dr. Salomon E. Melgen, guilty on 67 counts of health care fraud, can no longer bilk Medicare out of millions of dollars," said George L. Piro, Special Agent in Charge, FBI Miami. "No matter what the scheme or how elaborately it is disguised, the FBI and our law enforcement partners will investigate and criminally prosecute such fraud to the fullest extent of the law."

“Physicians who exploit Medicare patients through intentional misdiagnosis and medically unnecessary services just to boost their own profits have no place in our health care system,” said Special Agent in Charge Shimon R. Richmond of HHS Office of Inspector General. “Our agents will continue to pursue corrupt health professionals to protect patients and U.S. taxpayers.”

"Corrupt health care providers who defraud Federal health care systems divert precious tax dollars from where they are needed most," stated Special Agent in Charge John F. Khin, Southeast Field Office, DCIS. "The DCIS is committed, in joint investigations with our law enforcement partners, to bring those to justice who undermine the integrity of DoD's TRICARE program intended to serve military members and their families."

“Individuals that commit fraud against U.S. Government programs will continue to be investigated and prosecuted by us and our law enforcement partners,” said Patrick Fletcher, Special Agent in Charge, Office of Inspector General, Office of Investigations, for the U.S. RRB.

Mr. Greenberg commended the investigative efforts of the FBI, HHS-OIG, DCIS and RRB-OIG. This case is being prosecuted by Assistant United States Attorneys Roger H. Stefin, Carolyn Bell, and Alexandra Chase of the West Palm Beach Office.

Related court documents and information may be found on the website of the United States District Court for the Southern District of Florida at www.flsd.uscourts.gov or on http://pacer.flsd.uscourts.gov.

Monday, May 1, 2017

Maritime Monday for May 1st, 2017: Sexy Women Holding Carp

All-Flash #27, February-March 1947 – via Dirty River
shipsandseasworldwide: Morning commute to the office. Ship full of windmill parts heading to the upper lakes. Sent to us by @dontfearthesweeper
a sailor's embroidered sea bag, from Sailor Sewing on Pinterest

Some of Miss Monkey's closer associates already know that She earns Her beer money working part-time at a Maine based, family-owned clothing retailer that's been a Portland institution since 1919.  Whilst pulling her Saturday afternoon shift, an interesting tale unfolded. After passing this anecdote along to some of her friends later that evening, one finally blurted out (after a discrete expulsion of malt and barley infused carbonation) "That's the kinda sh*t you should write about, right there.  Put that in your little Maritime (bubbly and indecipherable) blog thing!"

So, for your Monday morning reading pleasure….

A young man came into the store yesterday afternoon.  When prompted, he timidly confessed to Her Monkeyness that he needed some long underwear. I escorted him to the Realm of Thermal Separates in the back of the store and began my spiel about the pros and cons of synthetic space fibers versus wool. Once my presentation was complete, I asked the boy what was his preference?  He gulped and said, "I'm waiting for my mom, she's on her phone out in the car." 

"Ok, then," I assured him…  "I'll keep an eye out and when Mom comes in, I'll be back to pick up where we left off, ok?"  He nodded and muttered, "yeah, ok, uhm, thanks"  Miss Monkey returned to her duties at the cash register and watched the door.

Mom stormed the store prepared. Phone in hand, she read from a list of needed supplies; specific down to the brand name. My assistance was appreciated, but not necessary, thank you, they knew what they were looking for.  Some 20 minutes later, Mother and son appeared at the cash register and dumped their booty onto the counter. Miss Monkey grouped like-items, looked up and asked, "Are you going to sea?"

embroidered Liberty cuffs – more about Liberty cuffs here and here

Mother and son were flabbergasted. "He graduates from Maine Maritime in two weeks, then is going to take a job in Seattle.  How did you know?"

"Seven pairs of synthetic blend, quick drying wool socks, 5 pairs of anti-microbial long underwear, and a work-weeks' worth of clearance-priced, lined flannel button up shirts.  This is what a sailor would take" I answered. She choke-laughed and smiling, asked, "How on earth would you know something like that?"

Miss Monkey knows these things and smiled as she rung up their purchases, musing at the tableau before her.  A nervous yet research-prepared mother was sending her son off into the world and his first big real job on a ship.  She may or may not realize that when he returns for possibly Thanksgiving or hopefully, Christmas, he will be a different man than the baby faced one standing obediently at her side this moment. He was about to be plunged into a world where she no longer had any influence or control, but she was damn sure he was going to have warm, dry feet. Good on ya, mom!

Maine Maritime, and a host of other schools, are this season sending out their crew of brand-new sailors. Please, welcome them warmly (snicker).  They are in your hands, now. Teach them well. Yours are the names, characters, and faces he is going to recall fondly when, after a career at sea, his eyes grow milky.

PS: He told me he was going to be on a cargo ship making the Seattle to Alaska run.  So, if you have a Maine Maritime FNG on your ship, don't steal his nice new socks… or you're going to have one angry mom to answer to.

Tomb of Jules Verne. Cimetiere de la Madeleine- Amiens – France

A time capsule which may belong to Jules Vernes was discovered near the French Pyrenees

Smithsonian: Hemingway led a life of adventure and, sometimes, violence. The author is shown here holding a tommy gun aboard the Pilar in 1935.

Multiple Concussions May Have Sped Hemingway's Demise, a Psychiatrist Argues

Thomas Moran, Sunset near Land's End (Cornwall, England), 1909 – via naval gazing (full size)
via dame-de-pique: Charles Williamson, a sea captain from Norfolk, Virginia, and father of John E. Williamson(b.1881), invented a deep-sea tube made of a series of concentric, interlocking iron rings, which facilitated easy communication and plentiful air down to depths of up to 250 feet. Originally intended to be used for underwater repair and for ship salvage, his son realized that his father's mechanism could also be used to obtain undersea photographs
read more here
via grand boute: Statue of Robert Surcouf in Saint-Malo by Alfred Caravaniez

Robert Surcouf (12 December 1773 – 8 July 1827) was a French privateer who operated in the Indian Ocean between 1789 and 1801, and again from 1807 to 1808. He started his career as a sailor and officer on the slave ships before moving to piracy. He captured over 40 prizes and amassed a large fortune as a ship-owner; from privateering, legitimate commerce, and fishing expeditions to Newfoundland.

French stealth-Frigate Surcouf at sea near Toulon
French 74-gun 3rd rate with frigate

The undiscovered origin of frigate

The history of the word frigate is expected to comfort Germanic scholars, who may not know that, regardless of the language, the names of ships invariably give etymologists grief. In English, frigate is from French, and in French it is from Italian, so that the question is: Where did Italian fregata come from? 

Since 1350, the year in which the word "fregata" first surfaced in Boccaccio's Decameron, it has designated many different types of vessels…

keep reading

photos of Russian latest Arctic ice breaker "Novorossiysk" on English Russia
The Marshall Island flagged, 29,812 gt open livestock carrier OCEAN DROVER alongside the common user berth, No. 11 NQ at Fremantle Port (AUS) on April 24, 2017. Photo by Andrew Priest. more
Michaela Harmon, left, Michelle Harmon and Michelle's sister, Laura Covington, look at a golden locket that belonged to A. Vernon Jannotta, Laura and Michelle's great-grandfather, who lost it when his U.S. Navy ship sank in 1918. (John Kelly/The Washington Post)

In 1918, a U.S. Navy ship sank. Last week, a piece of it surfaced in Maryland

The sunken treasure rested in a box inside another box inside an Audubon tote bag in Barry and Sharon Covington's Potomac, Md., living room. About two dozen people milled around, most related by blood or marriage to the man whose portrait was propped up next to the fireplace: A. Vernon Jannotta. It was his treasure inside that box and everyone wanted to see it.

USS California (ACR-6) in 1907: re-named San Diego, 1 September 1914. sunk 19 July 1918, by U-156

On the night of July 19, 1918, Jannotta was a young Navy ensign assigned to the USS San Diego, a cruiser that escorted troop convoys to Europe during World War I. One night, the ship struck a mine laid by a German submarine off Long Island. It took about 20 minutes for the ship to sink. Six men died. The rest spent six hours in the water.

"The Sinking of USS San Diego" by Francis Muller

Over the ensuing years, the wreck of the San Diego became a popular place for recreational divers. And though it had settled on the seafloor upside down, it was remarkably intact. Among the crowd gathered that night in Potomac were 2 such divers.  They had brought the treasure.  

keep reading on Washington Post

Museum of Found Photos: NYC, c. 1962?
Naval agent's trade card, engraved by W. Jones, c.1779-83, British Museum.

Edward Hooper made his living as a prize agent. When legitimate vessels (both civilian and naval) were seized by privateers or naval vessels, they and their cargoes were sold. This sale was divided into shares that the owners, officers, and crew of the victorious vessel would receive. Hooper's job was to divide and allocate those shares, and his pay was a portion of them.  keep reading on British Tars

The Guardian – Aerial view of the Solent strait between the Isle of Wight and the south coast of England. Photograph: Peter Barritt/Robert Harding

Millions of native oysters to be returned to the Solent

Millions of native oysters are to be put into the Solent, once the site of Europe's largest oyster fishery.
The five-year project aims first to restore a thriving oyster population to the waters between the south coast and Isle of Wight. Oyster beds provide habitat for many other species and the shellfish filter vast volumes of water – 200 litres per oyster – helping to clean up pollution.

Once re-established, significant oyster fishing could resume.  keep reading

Museum of Found Photos: one viewer remarks, "Looks like they are in the port of Genoa – the Forte Diamante and Forte Begato on the hills in the background."
Museum of Found Photos: Stonehaven, South of Aberdeen, Scotland
Museum of Found Photos – what appears to be biology specimens being drained, measured, and prepared for preservation in a lab. See also
Museum of Found Photos – "MV British Honour off Aruba, 1941". Some interesting comments left here
To get these priceless pics, photographer Raphael Faraggi runs the shoots in France over four weeks. He is assisted by "two competent caretakers," who are charged with cleaning and polishing the carps' scales before they are given to the models for the big pose.

Yes, there is a 'sexy women holding carp' calendar and, of course, it's gotta be from Germany

The calendar is the brainchild of a certain Hendrik Pöhler, a native of Germany who sells equipment for carp fishing for a living. According to Pöhler, "The idea for the calendar was to bring two of the greatest hobbies of men, fishing and women together." Right.  Click to read the story, not to look at the pictures

Lyn Taitt and the boys – Storm Warning

marblehead neck – photo by rickinmar

Adventures of the BlackgangCommentsMaritime Monday Archives



Original Page: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Gcaptain/~3/lbqGIH3poxA/



Sent from my iPad

Naval Search Engine

Total Pageviews

Find-A-Grave Link

Search 62.2 million cemetery records at by entering a surname and clicking search:
Surname: